Keystone 2021


Keystone 2021 cover design: abstract paint strokes in blues, oranges, yellows

View the process of how the cover came to be.


TABLE OF CONTENTS // keystone

ENHANCING STEM DIVERSITY
NSF grant focuses on broadening participation and promoting equity and equity and social justice in STEM for traditionally underrepresented groups.

SYDNEY FREEMAN
Freeman, a two-time graduate in higher education administration, recently became the first Black American man to become a full professor at the University of Idaho.  

ESOL PROGRAM
Students are pursuing the English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) graduate degree to become better equipped to teach students from across the globe.

JOYCE KIMELI
Exercise science student and elite student-athlete wants to help others as a nurse while chasing Olympic dreams.

GRANT TO PROMOTE DIVERSITY
AgEd awarded a USDA grant to recruit and prepare ethnically and gender diverse doctoral students with technical competence and leadership skills.

EXPANDING EAGLES
Expanding EAGLES employment initiative educates local businesses on employing individuals with disabilities and advocates for inclusion in the workplace.  

KATE LARKIN
Larkin kept her journey to a second master’s degree undercover to the surprise of family and friends.

DEAN FAIRBROTHER
Jeffrey Fairbrother began his tenure as dean of the College of Education on Oct. 1, 2020. He brings wide-ranging experiences and a desire for innovation to the college.  


WELCOME // Dean Fairbrother

In the College of Education, our vision is to lead and shape the future. And for each of us, our future is grounded in the educational opportunities we receive. Education is a foundation that supports all possible paths to the future. Think back on your first or favorite teacher, the one who sparked in you a love of learning. Think about how that person helped to shape your future.

This past year has been one like no other. Our country was changed forever by both a pandemic and a national reckoning with race and social justice. Education, too, charted a new course. We adapted our centuries-old tradition of school buildings and in-person learning to use new technologies and remote instruction on a monumental scale. Many are left wondering how our society can embrace the best of our past while also welcoming what often seems an uncertain future.

We in the College of Education want our society to thrive, not just survive. To see that happen, we must include everyone. We should focus on how our differences can strengthen us and on the ways we are alike. We may travel different paths, but we share common needs for health and education, two essential aspects of what we do in the College of Education. 

This issue of Keystone has as its theme Inclusive Excellence. By inclusive excellence we mean not only acknowledging a variety of experiences and perspectives, but also welcoming cultural differences that enhance our understanding of the different ways that people live, learn and think. Moreover, as we seek to be a welcoming and accepting community, we also strive to support each other in the pursuit of the highest standards of ethical and impactful teaching, outreach and research. 

Examples of our college’s commitment to inclusive excellence are included in these pages. We see it in our faculty members who conduct groundbreaking research in areas that directly impact the health, education and wellbeing of our fellow citizens. We see it in our efforts to include more people from traditionally underrepresented groups as we serve others. We see it in all of our people who represent diverse ways of thinking and leading but who have in common a desire to be that teacher, or scholar or servant who opens the minds and hearts of the next generation of leaders.

As I say elsewhere in this issue, we want to advance society by improving people’s health and by expanding educational opportunities. As we prepare our students to contribute to our changing world, we must be mindful that this requires all of us—at Auburn and beyond—to dedicate ourselves to providing increased access to health and educational programs for all. The College of Education can and should be a major force in expanding those opportunities for others.

Jeffrey Fairbrother signature
Dean Jeffrey Fairbrother