Counseling Psychology Program Policies


General Introduction to Counseling Psychology Program Policies | Policy Statement #1:  Ethics & Respect | Policy Statement #2:  Counseling Psychology Faculty: Criteria and Responsibilities | Policy Statement #3:  Full-Time Enrollment and Time in Residence | Policy Statement #4: Employment/Volunteer Guidelines | Policy Statement #5:  Competencies and Evaluation of Counseling Psychology Students | Policy Statement #6:  Due Process, Remediation, and Dismissal | Policy Statement #7:  Respect for Diversity | Policy Statement #8:  Discrimination and Harassment | Policy Statement #9:  Filing Academic Grievances | Policy Statement #10:  Guidelines for the Exemption of Courses | Policy Statement #11: Doctoral Classification | Policy Statement #12:  Composition of Doctoral Committee | Policy Statement #13:  Internship | Policy Statement #14:  Taking Courses at Other Universities after Admission | Policy Statement #15:  Required Courses | Policy Statement #16: Practicum or Externship/Other Program Approved Clinical Experiences | Policy Statement #17: Advisor | Policy Statement #18: Use of Independent Studies to Substitute for Required Courses | Policy Statement #19:  Participating in the Program’s Student Organization | Policy Statement#20:  Intimate Relations with Students | Policy Statement #21:  Problems with Competency (Previously “Impairment”) | Policy Statement #22:  Grades of “C” | Policy Statement #23: Practicum Evaluation | Policy Statement #24:  Due Process and Grievance Procedures for Faculty | Policy Statement #25:  Minimum Levels of Acceptable Achievement | Policy Statement #26:  Domains of Knowledge Required for Written Prelims | Policy Statement #27:  Student Support Services | Policy Statement #28:  University Policies and Rules | Policy Statement #29:  Admissions Requirements of Degree Completion | Policy Statement #30: Assistantships | Policy Statement #31: Social Media and Public Representations | Appendix I | Appendix II

General Introduction to Counseling Psychology Program Policies

The following manual is a compilation of policies and procedures relating to the Counseling Psychology Program at Auburn University. Exceptions may be made to them when such an exception is deemed appropriate by the Counseling Psychology Faculty. These policies and procedures are subject to revision at any time. All policies and procedures relating to the Counseling Psychology Program have been developed by the Counseling Psychology Faculty, and final authority concerning all policy matters will rest with the Counseling Psychology Faculty, subject to Auburn University policies and legal constraints.

Because digital information is easily reproduced and disseminated, outdated policies may be in circulation, whether in hardcopy, on individual computers, or on the web. When there are substantive concerns, students, prospective students, and other interested parties should check with the program director to ensure that they are consulting the latest version of the program policies. Typically, any change in policy will be distributed quickly and first by email and subsequently this document, with its complete list of policies, will be updated less frequently.

Although the faculty will use its discretion in determining whether a given policy change applies to all students in the program or only to cohorts of students entering after a certain point, the faculty will strive to use fairness and reasonableness when making this decision. Variables to be considered will include, but may not be limited to, the integrity of the program, contextual variables such as evolving professional standards, the scope and impact of the change, and the best interests of students, both individually and collectively, broadly considered. The general rule (beyond reasonableness and fairness) will be that the larger the impact of the change, the more likely that some cohorts will be excluded from the change in policy.

NOTE: Within this document, the terms “Doctoral Committee,” “Advisory Committee,” and “Doctoral Advisory Committee” are used interchangeably. The terms “Director of Counseling Psychology Training,” “Director of Training,” “Training Director,” and “Program Director” are also used interchangeably.

Policy Statement #1: Ethics & Respect

Students must adhere to the most recent version of the American Psychological Association’s “Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct.” Consultation concerning ethical dilemmas is strongly encouraged. The program emphasizes the role of personal responsibility and critical introspection. The faculty encourages you to report unethical behavior; the faculty also encourages you to examine your own values and biases carefully before accusing others of unethical conduct. If you believe that another student is having serious problems in professional competency, we encourage you to either talk with this student or discuss the issue with the Program Director or another faculty member. Furthermore, if you have reason to suspect that a faculty member or clinical supervisor has problems in professional competency, we also encourage you to consult with others about your concerns and make such concerns know to your advisor, the Program Director, or the Department Head.

The faculty emphasize that students are to be treated with dignity, courtesy, and respect at all times. Complaints falling outside or below the typical scope of harassment, discrimination, or academic grievances (e.g., complaints involving lack of courtesy or respect) may be discussed with the Program Director, the Department Head, or another faculty member in whom you have trust. Faculty hold themselves accountable, and also expect students to hold themselves accountable, to behave in ways which exceed legal requirements and ethical standards. (See also Policy #7-Respect for Diversity.)

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Policy Statement #2: Counseling Psychology Faculty: Criteria and Responsibilities

The purpose of this policy is to describe the general criteria and responsibilities of faculty members involved in the Counseling Psychology Program at Auburn University.

Four categories of faculty have been identified for involvement in the Counseling Psychology Program: (1) core Counseling Psychology Faculty, (2) Associated Faculty, (2) Counseling Psychology Adjunct Faculty (throughout this document, the terms “Affiliated Faculty” and “Other Contributors” may also be used to refer to this latter group), and (4) Other Contributors. These four groups are described in terms of criteria and areas of responsibility.

I. Counseling Psychology Faculty

A. Criteria
All members of the Counseling Psychology Faculty must be committed to the training of counseling psychologists. They must be familiar with issues such as training models in psychology and guidelines and Ethical Standards promulgated by the American Psychological Association. Active membership in APA Division 17 is strongly encouraged.
Counseling Psychology Faculty are also encouraged to participate in APA conventions by attendance, program presentation, and continuing education activities in counseling psychology. Faculty who desire to be members of the Counseling Psychology Faculty may be so designated by majority vote of the current Counseling Psychology Faculty, if they meet the general standards described above and if, in addition, they meet one or more of the following criteria:

1) Licensed as a psychologist;

2) Graduate of an APA-accredited Counseling Psychology Program;

3) Any one of the following: Senior authorship of two or more publications in an APA or APA divisional journal; three or more content/poster presentations at the annual meeting of APA; junior authorship of one or more publications in an APA or APA divisional journal plus two content/poster presentations at the annual meeting of APA; achievements or productivity substantially similar to any of the criteria above;

4) Membership in, and history of involvement with, Division 17 of the American Psychological Association, the Society of Counseling Psychology.

5) Trained as a psychologist and having a demonstrated substantial commitment to, and involvement with, the Counseling Psychology Program at Auburn.

Persons not teaching in the Department of Special Education, Rehabilitation, and Counseling may be considered for membership on the Counseling Psychology Faculty if, in addition to meeting the above criteria, these faculty members have a demonstrated history of support, interest, and involvement in the profession of Counseling Psychology and the Counseling Psychology Program at Auburn University.

B. Responsibilities
The faculty of the Counseling Psychology Program have clear and primary responsibility for all aspects of the program. The Counseling Psychology Faculty will generally have the following responsibilities:

1) Teaching

2) Advising

3) Admitting new students

4) Developing and reviewing the curriculum

5) Developing and reviewing policy

6) Directing theses and dissertations

7) Reviewing students’ progress

8) Developing, administering, and scoring doctoral comprehensive examinations

II. Adjunct and Associated Counseling Psychology Faculty

A. Associated Faculty Criteria
Associated Faculty members have a demonstrated interest in the Counseling Psychology Program at Auburn University. These individuals hold faculty status (tenure- track, tenured, or clinical) at Auburn University with a primary affiliation in another program or unit. They typically teach students in the Counseling Psychology program; however, they may also contribute to the program in other ways (e.g., occasionally serving as advisors).
Although these faculty contribute to the program, the ultimately responsibility and decision-making for the program lies with the Counseling Psychology faculty. Recognition as Associated Faculty follows that outlined for accredited psychology programs by the American Psychological Association. In addition to the above, the individual, in the opinion of the program faculty, demonstrates an appropriate interest in the program and its students.

B. Adjunct Faculty Criteria
Adjunct Counseling Psychology Faculty members are persons who have a demonstrated interest in the Counseling Psychology Program at Auburn University. Recommendation for designation as an adjunct faculty member shall be made by the Counseling Psychology faculty, and will be voted upon by the tenured faculty in the Department. These individuals are considered Other Contributors to the program.

C. Other Contributors Criteria
Other Contributors to the Counseling Psychology Faculty will be made up of persons who have a demonstrated interest in the Counseling Psychology Program at Auburn University. Such an interest can involve (1) meeting adjunct faculty criteria, (2) supervising students, (3) serving on student examination and dissertation committees, and (4) engaging in research activities with students. The Core Counseling Psychology faculty make the determination of who qualifies as other contributing faculty based on the recommendation of the Director-of-Training.

D. Responsibilities of Associated Faculty, Adjunct Faculty, and Other Contributors
These individuals may be involved in various aspects of the program and may have the following responsibilities:

1) Teaching

2) Supervising practica

3) Presenting colloquia

4) Making recommendations concerning the program

5) Serving on student advisory committees
It is expected that associated and adjunct faculty will meet periodically with the Counsel- ing Psychology Faculty in order to maintain open communication, provide input, and receive feedback. It is expected that other contributors who are not adjunct faculty will maintain open communication, provide input, receive feedback, and meet when necessary. Associated and Adjunct faculty will not only be involved in the obvious operational aspects of the program, but will also serve as role models for the counseling psychology students. Similarly, Other Contributors who are not adjunct faculty are involved in the operational aspects of the program through their work with students and serve as role models to the students.

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Policy Statement #3: Policy Concerning “Full-Time” Enrollment and “Time in Residence”

The philosophy of the Counseling Psychology Faculty at Auburn University is that students enrolled in the program should be devoting their professional energy to doctoral study. “Full- time” will be defined as taking a normal course load in sequence (usually four courses, which generally translates into approximately 12 semester hours) as outlined in published program documents. Students who enroll with a master’s degree and substitute courses may find that they will not need to enroll for 12 hours during some semesters. Although students are not technically required to enroll during the summer to remain in good standing, the practicalities of enrollment are such that students will in essence be required to take some courses during the summer. In particular, summer enrollment is required if that is the only term during which a required course is taught.

For individuals who entered the program after Fall, 2014, students must spend four years on campus completing curriculum requirements. This policy is set to exceed the minimum requirements published by the program’s accrediting body (the American Psychological Association) and ensure that there is sufficient time for students to complete a carefully sequenced set of courses which enables them to build on earlier learning in later years.

It is expected that employment, assistantships, and/or volunteer work will not interfere with the student’s normal progress through the program. That is, 1) the completion of courses and 2) the completion of courses in the required sequence shall take precedence over employment, assistantships, and volunteer work. Similarly, the program values students pursuing additional academic interests that complement their training and work as a future counseling psychologist and expect that pursue of such complementary interests will not interfere with normal progress through the program including the enrollment in required program courses and completion of required program experiences. The program is not able to arrange courses around elective interests students may pursue but does encourage students to pursue such interests when their schedule allows.

Beginning for students entering in the Fall term of 2016, any student who remains in the program must be enrolled during each Fall term. If students have completed all required coursework, it is expected that they will be enrolled in either COUN 8990 (dissertation credit) or COUN 8930 (internship). Failure to enroll in at least one course within the program in the Fall term will be considered a violation of program policies and prompt the development of a remediation plan. Failure to enroll in at least one course within the program after being placed on remediation will be deemed to constitute voluntary withdrawal from the program by the student. Beyond this policy, students must be continuously enrolled while pursuing their degree (except summers) and must enroll in courses as sequenced by the program.

For students entering during or after the Fall term of 2017, students must be enrolled in dissertation credit (COUN 8990) each term after they have completed their written exams. Exceptions to this policy may be granted if the student has successfully passed their written exams and the student will not be working on the dissertation during the summer term. We define “not be working” as not involved in data collection and not having a dissertation meeting with the committee. For students who entered prior to the Fall term of 2017, students should be enrolled continuously for dissertation credit following the completion of orals until the final defense and submission of an approved dissertation to the graduate school.

For students entering in the Fall term of 2016, the student must be enrolled in COUN 8990 (dissertation credit) during the semesters in which they propose and defend their dissertation. The dissertation meetings will not be scheduled when a student is not enrolled in this course for at least 1 credit hour. All students should be aware that if they have not defended the dissertation prior to the starting of their internship, they will have to pay tuition at the appropriate rate (out-of-state for anyone not holding status as an Alabama resident) for COUN 8990. Tuition waivers, should a student be eligible for one, cannot be continued while a student is on internship because the student cannot hold an assistantship at Auburn University at the same time that they are on internship.

In the event that there is a compelling reason why a student cannot enroll for the appropriate courses, an exception may be granted upon the concurrence of the student’s advisor and the Director of Counseling Psychology Training. Leaves of absence, which are strongly discouraged, may be granted only by the Counseling Psychology Faculty. Students are also encouraged to review and must abide by the graduate school policies regarding continuous enrollment.

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Policy Statement #4: Employment/Volunteer Guidelines

The Counseling Psychology Faculty recognizes and supports the notion that some students may want or need to hold a part-time work position (paid or unpaid) relating to the field of counseling psychology while pursuing doctoral study. The faculty also recognizes, however, that students working in jobs related to psychology will inevitably present themselves as Ph.D. students in the Counseling Psychology Program at Auburn University. To ensure appropriate representation of the program, as well as to ensure appropriate supervision of students in psychology-related experiences, the following guidelines exist: If a student desires to hold any position which is related to psychology (e.g., working at a mental health center, leading groups for a college organization, teaching, etc.), such employment/experience must be approved by the student’s advisor and the Director of Counseling Psychology Training well in advance. Students seeking such opportunities must file a Program Approved Clinical Experience (PACE) form (beginning spring of 2015) for any clinically related activity other than ACOPS-sponsored (outreach events advertised through ACOPS meetings or ACOPS emails that include the director-of-training constitute ACOPS-sponsored). The form can be retrieved from a link off of the program website. Unless approval is obtained, the student may not include any activity from such endeavors in their APPIC hours and may be dismissed from the program for failure to follow program policies. In most cases, students will be required to submit an evaluation from the identified supervisor for their work. If any situation should arise which cannot be resolved through the procedures outlined in this document, final authority in such situations will rest with the Counseling Psychology Faculty.

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Policy Statement #5: Competencies and Evaluation of Counseling Psychology Students

Program Aim and Competencies
The program has a single overarching aim: The goal of the Auburn University program in Counseling Psychology is to facilitate students’ development of a high level of competency in the discipline of counseling psychology consistent with the scientist-practitioner model of training in health service psychology.

As a program that values accreditation and seeks to maintain accreditation, we have adopted, effective January 1, 2017, the following Profession Wide Competencies (along with the elements described in IR C-8 D) articulated by the American Psychological Association Commission on Accreditation:

I. Research

II. Ethical and Legal Standards

III. Individual and Cultural Diversity

IV. Professional Values and Attitudes

V. Communication and Interpersonal SkillsVI. Assessment

VII. Intervention

VIII. Supervision

IX. Consultation and

X. Interprofessional/Interdisciplinary Skills

The program also has two additional program specific competencies (elements appear in the addendum to this document)

A. Group Therapy

B. Social Justice

The Appendices provide a detailed description of how the program ensures students have the appropriate training/experience in each competency area and how the program ensures students demonstrate skills that meet the minimum level of achievement for each competency. Students will note that each competency contains multiple elements. The student must meet minimum levels of achievements for all elements within a competency area in order to have meet the requirements for competence in the specific domain. Appendix I contains the List of Required Courses and Learning Activities. Appendix II lists the competencies, their elements, the educational experiences that facilitate development of competence, and the minimum levels of achievement specified by the program.

Because most of these competencies were reflected in core components of the curriculum under the previous guidelines and principles of the Commission on Accreditation (the requirements for accreditation that were in place prior to January 1, 2017), all students will demonstrate competency in each of these domains regardless of the date of their entry into the program. For students who enter the program during or after Fall, 2017, there are additional ways in which students will demonstrate achieving these competencies at both the broad level of the competency and at the level of the elements. The specific requirements for demonstrating competencies are provided as an addendum to this policy document.

The Counseling Psychology Faculty believe that it is very important for all counseling psychology students to be periodically evaluated as they progress through the program and that students be provided with appropriate feedback. This evaluative process will occur in a number of ways:

I. Grades and other sources of feedback received in individual courses are a primary means of evaluation. On-site supervisors (for practicum students) will be asked to complete evaluation forms concerning therapeutic skills each semester. For students who enter during or after Fall, 2017, research lab supervisors will be asked to complete evaluation forms as part of the Colloquium in Counseling Psychology courses. Finally, formal evaluation processes that are part of the comprehensive exams (written exams, oral exam, and dissertation) are used for evaluation of students.

II. Counseling psychology students and their advisors are encouraged to meet frequently to discuss students’ progress. In addition to these regular meetings, members of the Counseling Psychology Faculty will meet individually with each of their advisees at least once a year (such meetings may occur through technology for students who have completed all courses and moved away for internship) for the purpose of providing students with comprehensive feedback, and discussing students’ goals, development, etc.

III. Counseling Psychology Faculty will meet as a group once a year for the purpose of evaluating students, with the ultimate goal being the facilitating and encouraging of student progress through the program. In anticipation of this meeting, counseling psychology students will be required to provide information to their advisor and the Program Director concerning their accomplishments and activities. The meeting of the Counseling Psychology Faculty may also include other departmental faculty, in order to secure a broad range of feedback about each student’s performance. As a part of this meeting, advisors will briefly discuss each of their advisees’ overall development, including strengths and areas in need of improvement. Program faculty and other departmental faculty may also share information about students with students’ advisors and make recommendations concerning student progress so that advisors will be knowledgeable about their advisees’ development. Similarly, assistantship supervisors are often asked to provide feedback about student performance in the assistantship. When such information is made available to advisors, this information will be shared, as appropriate, with advisees. The ultimate goal of this process is that students’ progress and development be enhanced and that students receive feedback about their performance. Results of these discussions will be communicated to each counseling psychology student in writing by the student’s advisor.

The discussion of students will include a focus on each of the program’s published competencies. Relevant data addressing each competency will be reviewed for each student. In addition, special attention will be paid to evaluating whether the student has obtained requisite competencies for those students who intend to apply to internship (see Policy #13) so that the Counseling Psychology Faculty can render a decision with regard to readiness for internship. Students should consult the published program competencies and requirements on the program website. Furthermore, because student development in its broadest sense is the goal of all training programs in professional psychology, general standards of professional behavior may also be discussed. Examples of factors which may be discussed during the meeting include (but are not limited to) earned grades and general classroom performance, involvement with the profession, research activity, practicum or internship performance, performance as a Graduate Teaching or Graduate Research Assistant, appropriate use of advisor, progress toward the Ph.D. degree, and relationships with students and faculty.

Examples of behavior (in addition to evidence of achieving competencies) which would have a positive impact on the evaluation include (but are not limited to) publishing articles and being involved in research, giving convention presentations, attending professional conventions or workshops, showing exemplary performance in courses, receiving positive comments from supervisors and instructors, engaging in volunteer activities related to the profession of psychology, engaging in activities that align with the program values regarding diversity and social justice, being involved in professional organizations, making contributions to the department and program, engaging in behavior which is supportive of other students, and displaying mature or creative handling of difficulties encountered.

It is, of course, impossible to generate a complete list of all students’ actions which might have a negative impact on this evaluation or which might lead to a remediation plan at any time during the year as needed. Failure to reach competency levels may lead to a required remediation plan at any point in one’s graduate education. Consistent with our own program policies/competencies and those of the Graduate School, failure to maintain the required graduate grade-point average may lead to action by the Graduate School. Other student behaviors which may lead to action by the Student’s advisory committee, the Counseling Psychology Program, and/or Department include unethical conduct with a client or fellow student, violations of the Ethical Standards of the American Psychological Association, cheating or plagiarism, failure to perform satisfactorily in an internship, practicum, or assistantship setting, failing to successfully complete comprehensive examinations, dropping courses without permission, failure to complete courses in the required sequence and at the required time, failure to show reasonable tolerance, acceptance and appreciation of others and their viewpoints (see Policy Statement #7), failure to respond productively to feedback, failure to follow program policies, showing egregious disrespect for other professions, commission of a felony, violations of Auburn University policies or rules, or engaging in conduct which, in the opinion of the Counseling Psychology Faculty, is inconsistent with the standards generally expected of graduate students in a Counseling Psychology Program.

During the yearly evaluation meeting, special attention will be given to discussing individuals who have completed all requirements for their degree except the dissertation and who have completed their seventh year in the program. The advisor for any student in this category whose graduation is not imminent shall communicate with the student concerning his or her lack of progress. Taking into consideration individual variables, students will be placed on remediation and advisors will create with the student a plan to graduate. This plan may include deadlines after which due process may result in recommendation for dismissal by the advisory committee for failure to make satisfactory progress toward his or her degree. Students and advisors are reminded of the Graduate School policy which requires that the student reapply to take the oral examination once four years have passed since the exam was successfully taken (link to the Bulletin for all Graduate School Policies). The Dean of the Graduate School may disapprove such a request; furthermore, it is the program’s policy that in order to remain in the program (that is, for students to be successful in their efforts for reapplication), the student’s doctoral committee must support the reapplication. Any student who has not completed all program requirements within four years of their oral exam will be considered to have failed to make satisfactory progress toward degree completion and will be placed on remediation.

Students who fail to make satisfactory progress toward their degree, either in academic progress or personal/professional development, may be placed on remediation by their doctoral committee (see Policy Statement #6).

The graduate school also requires that at least one semester must intervene between the semester in which students pass their oral exam and the semester in which students defend their dissertation. Students should be aware of this requirement and graduate school policies on time limits for doctoral students. Graduate school policies state that doctoral students should achieve candidacy within six years of enrollment and complete all requirements within ten. Students who have not met program requirements within four years of achieving candidacy revert to an applicant. Students may appeal for an extension of one year from the graduate school, but students should be aware that such extensions are not guaranteed and require the support of the program for continued enrollment.

IV. All counseling psychology students will take a comprehensive written examination which lasts one-half day for each of three days during one week. The dates of the examination will be announced by the Training Director. Typically, students will have completed most of their coursework prior to taking the examination, will have a committee in place, and will have filed a plan of study. Because the comprehensive written examination and accompanying psychotherapy project require students to demonstrate competency in all areas included in the program aim, students should not take the written comprehensive exams until they are ready to demonstrate mastery of scientific knowledge, research skill, and clinical skill. The examination will be constructed by the Counseling Psychology Faculty. Questions involving culture and diversity may be included in any of the three major areas covered by the examination:

A. Research: This section includes research design and statistics

B. Counseling Theory and Practice: This section will include theories of counseling, individual counseling, counseling diverse populations, career counseling and development, and group counseling.

C. Ethics and Professional Issues in Counseling Psychology: This section includes ethics in psychology and professional issues in psychology in general and counseling psychology in particular.

Grading of the Doctoral Written Examination
The examination will be graded by the Counseling Psychology Faculty, with two readers grading each of the three sections. Students will receive a grade of “fail” (this constitutes a failing grade), “low pass,” “pass,” or “high pass” on each section of the examination. In the event that the student receives a “fail” from one reader and a different grade from a second reader, the section will be read by a third reader, whose rating will determine the final outcome. Grades of “low pass” reflect weak, yet passing, performance in the domain.

It is the preference and intention of the Counseling Psychology Faculty that students pass all sections of the examination on their first attempt. However, in the event that some sections are failed, the following procedure applies:

NOTE: In the discussion below, the term “remedial option” does not refer to a formal written “remediation” plan, but rather to an assignment made by the Doctoral Committee. These assignments may be made verbally or in writing, but in any event, the student is not considered to be “in remediation.”

For students who entered the program prior to the Fall term of 2017, the following guidelines will apply. However, a student who falls under this policy may choose to abide by the new policy that was developed for students entering during or after Fall, 2017. Any student wishing to abide by this new policy must indicate, in writing via email submitted to their advisor(s) and the Training Director, their intent to be evaluated under the new policy. This notice must be made no later than the minute before the student sits for the first day of their written preliminary exams.

I. If a student fails one section only, the student’s Doctoral Committee designates a remedial option, which may or may not involve re-writing the failed section. The Doctoral Committee has the option of allowing the student to proceed to the oral exam where special emphasis will be given to the failed section.

II. If a student fails two or three sections, then the appropriate sections must be re-taken. The advisor is responsible for the administration of this retake, but the decision concerning when it is to be administered is made jointly by the advisor and the Counseling Psychology Faculty, with input from the student, and questions are developed by the faculty.

A. If the student fails one section at this administration, the doctoral committee designates a remedial option, which may or may not involve re-writing the failed section.

B. If the student fails two or three sections, the Counseling Psychology Program Faculty will recommend to the student’s Doctoral Committee that the Doctoral Committee give the student a formal remediation plan, which will culminate in the retaking of the failed sections a third time. The remediation plan may also include other assignments such as taking courses or writing papers. The sections will not be administered more than a total of three times (including the first administration of the entire examination).

1) If the student fails one section only during this third administration, the doctoral committee designates a remedial option. The Doctoral Committee has the authority to incorporate the remedial option into an extension of the remediation plan or to remove the student from formal remediation and handle the remedial option more informally.

2) If more than one section is failed a third time, the Counseling Psychology Faculty will make a recommendation to the doctoral committee concerning termination or continuation in the program.

Upon successful completion of the doctoral written examination, students may take the oral examination to be administered by members of the advisory committee, provided that they have also passed the psychotherapy project, which is described below. For these students, the oral exam will be a two-hour meeting in which students will answer questions that relate to the same general domains as those outlined above. Prior to the oral exam, the student must complete appropriate paperwork as required by the graduate school. In preparing for this meeting, students are encouraged to consult the same list of materials used to guide preparation for the written exam. The oral exam is an evaluation that extends the evaluation of written work, enables additional evaluation of areas where written performance was weaker, and enables for a discussion-based format for students to demonstrate their knowledge. The spirit of this evaluation is one in which the demonstration of both broad knowledge of psychology and psychological thinking is expected for adequate performance. The Doctoral Committee may ask questions that address program competencies, current events in the field of Counseling Psychology, and content related to the sections represented within the written exam. In the event that the oral examination is failed, the Graduate School’s policy concerning such failure will be followed. In addition, the committee will provide specific guidance for student’s preparation for re-examination.

The following new policy applies to students who entered the program during or after the Fall term of 2017.

NOTE: Re-write refers to responding to the same questions that were administered during a previous examination of the student; re-take and re-examination refer to the administration of new questions.

I. All students must pass the written portion of the exam for all three sections prior to taking the oral exam.

A. If a student fails only one section, the section must be re-written. In this case, the re- write will be done during the same term with the same questions. In this case, the student will receive only general feedback about their performance on the section to be re-written. The student will not be allowed to review the questions or his/her/zer responses prior to the re-write. The member of the Counseling Psychology Program Faculty responsible for coordinating the written portion of the exam will announce the date for the re-write and the student will make him/her/zerself available for the re-write as scheduled by the faculty.

i. Should the student not pass this the re-write for the section, the student will be required to re-take the written exam for the failed section during the following year (the student must wait at least three months prior to requesting the re-examination) with new questions. The earliest date of the re- examination will be the first day of classes the following Fall term. This will require the Counseling Psychology Program Faculty to develop new questions and schedule a time for the exam.

ii. If the student fails the section during this third administration, the Doctoral Committee will designate a remedial option. The section will not be administered more than a total of three times (including the first administration of the entire examination). The Doctoral Committee has the authority to incorporate the remedial option into an extension of the remediation plan or to remove the student from formal remediation and handle the remedial option more informally.

B. If a student fails two or three sections, then the appropriate sections must be re- taken the following year (not sooner than the first day of classes the following Fall term). The student will work with the Counseling Psychology Faculty to designate a time to re-take the sections. This will require the Counseling Psychology Faculty to develop new questions.

i. If the student fails one section at this administration, the Doctoral Committee designates a remedial option. At a minimum, this remedial option will involve re-writing the same questions for the failed section. However, the remedial option may involve additional requirements based on the judgement of the faculty. By policy, the student will only be allowed to receive general feedback about performance in preparation for the re-write. The student will not be allowed to review the questions or his/her/zer responses prior to the re-write.

ii. If the student fails two or three sections, the Counseling Psychology Program Faculty will recommend to the student’s Doctoral Committee that the Doctoral Committee give the student a formal remediation plan, which will culminate in the retaking of the failed sections a third time. This re-take will require the Counseling Psychology Program Faculty to schedule a time and develop new questions for the exam. The remediation plan may also include other assignments such as taking courses or writing papers. The sections will not be administered more than a total of three times (including the first administration of the entire examination).

1) If the student fails one section only during this third administration, the doctoral committee designates a remedial option. The Doctoral Committee has the authority to incorporate the remedial option into an extension of the remediation plan or to remove the student from formal remediation and handle the remedial option more informally

2) If more than one section is failed a third time, the Counseling Psychology Faculty will make a recommendation to the doctoral committee concerning termination or continuation in the program.

II. Upon successful completion of the doctoral written examination (students must pass all written sections), students may take the oral examination to be administered by members of the advisory committee, provided that they have also passed the psychotherapy project, which is described below. Prior to the oral exam, the student must complete appropriate paperwork as required by the graduate school. For students who enter the program during or after Fall of 2017, the dissertation proposal will serve as the oral exam.

A. The oral exam will involve several components.

i. Submission of the dissertation proposal to the Doctoral Committee (the committee can determine how far ahead of the meeting they wish to receive the document; typically this is two weeks).

ii. A brief presentation of the justification and purpose of the study, hypotheses, design, analyses, and limitations of proposed study

iii. Responding to questions posed by the committee

B. Passing of the oral exam requires two things. First, the committee must agree that the student’s proposal was adequate and that the student can continue with their dissertation after making corrections (which may or may not require review by the committee). Second, the student must receive passing ratings on all sections of the “Rating Form for Counseling Psychology Student Oral Exam – Dissertation Proposal.” Students must receive a rating of “2” or higher for the following areas: Formulate Research – 1, Formulate Research – 2, Research Knowledge, and Oral Presentation Skills. In addition, students must receive a rating of “3” or higher for “Ethics.” These ratings will be based on the student’s ability to verbally articulate a clear plan for their dissertation research that the committee believes will adequately test/evaluate the research hypotheses and/or questions within the study and that demonstrates ethical practice for psychologists. Minor changes to the written proposal will not be considered a failure of the oral exam. A student who is required to make substantial revisions to the design and hold another proposal meeting will be considered to have failed the exam. A student whose presentation is judged to fail to meet minimum expectations (regardless of level of changes) such that they are required to hold another proposal meeting to demonstrate their ability to present their ideas will be considered to have failed the exam. In the event that the oral examination is failed (meaning the proposal is not approved), the Graduate School’s policy concerning such failure will be followed. In addition, the committee will provide specific guidance to assist the student in preparing to successfully pass their next attempt at the oral examination.

i. Informal meetings held in preparation of the dissertation document and dissertation proposal are not considered part of the oral exam and students are encouraged to work with all committee members to ensure that their proposed design is acceptable.

ii. In addition, students are encouraged to seek consultation at the Writing Center to ensure that their written communication is clear. Substantial challenges in understanding the written document may make the proposal meeting more challenging because the committee will be more reliant on the student to explain the design.

iii. A committee may request to review a revision of the written document (in whole or part) prior to approving the student to move forward with their dissertation without requiring the student to redo the proposal meeting. In such cases, the student has not failed the oral exam.

III. Psychotherapy Project
The overall goal of the project is to help the faculty assess the therapy and
therapy-related skills (to evaluate competence) of the student, to give students a chance to practice case presentation, and also to give students an opportunity to reflect on their strengths and weaknesses as a therapist. It is the student’s responsibility to be sure that his/her/zer selected practicum placement will allow for the demonstration of clinical skills and mastery in a way that fits within these requirements.

This document outlines the requirements for a psychotherapy project which was created as part of an overall revision of the written portion of the preliminary examination to achieve the above-stated goals. The project consists of: (a) a tape and written transcript of a session (in cases where tapes are not allowed outside of the practicum setting, the transcript alone will suffice; all students must submit a typed transcript even when tape is available); (b) a typed analysis of the tape and the overall case (see below); and (c) a question and answer period with the three faculty members in attendance at the defense meeting.
Requirements:

1) Deadline: Students must submit their completed psychotherapy project to the faculty no later than one year after the completion of their written comprehensive exams.

2) General Contents of Project: By the deadline date, students are required to turn into the faculty who evaluate psychotherapy projects (which is generally comprised of core faculty who teach practicum courses): (1) a complete transcript of a psychotherapy session made while training at Auburn, and (2) the written materials.

a. The transcript and written case materials should only be submitted in hard copy to maximize security of confidential information. Students will provide one copy to each faculty member that will be involved in evaluation of the project. If a student is uncertain of who these faculty members will be, the student should contact the faculty member who is designated to coordinate the psychotherapy project.

b. In addition, students will bring to the presentation a video tape of the session to play. In most instances, students are expected to provide a video tape to play for the presentation (which the student will bring directly to the presentation). If for some reason the agency where the therapy was done prohibits all taping or prohibits the removing of audio and video tapes from the premises, the student must still furnish a transcript. Transcribing the session to a transcript format is the responsibility of the student. Irrespective of the medium, appropriate steps must be taken to safeguard the identity of the client and appropriate informed consent must be secured.

3) Timing:

a. No student may submit a case from their first year of practicum to meet the psychotherapy requirement.

b. Students will schedule a meeting for their presentation (fitting within the one-year post-written examination requirement). Students will be expected to provide faculty members with several options for meeting times and should review teaching schedules (which can be accessed on the university website under course listings) prior to attempting to schedule the meeting. Students will also be expected to modify their own schedule as needed to identify a time that works for all faculty.

c. All written materials, and evaluation forms for student who enter the program during or after Fall, 2017, must be submitted to the faculty at least 2 weeks prior their meeting date.

d. Since performance on the project may be pertinent to faculty recommendations for internship, the project must be completed by the 15th of September during term internship applications are submitted. Students are strongly encouraged to complete the project no later than the spring prior to the fall during which internship applications are submitted to ensure that students have sufficient time to complete any required revisions before the deadline for the general oral examination.

4) Qualifying sessions and cases:

a. The psychotherapy session must not be an “intake session.”

b. The project must involve a client who was seen for a minimum of four sessions.

c. The session used (transcribed and played) must last approximately 50 minutes.

d. The tape session must not consist solely or substantially of one specific therapeutic technique such as exposure, relaxation training, etc.

e. The session must demonstrate your ability to respond therapeutically to individual differences and the dynamics within the session.

5) The Psychotherapy Project Presentation:

a. Students will present the psychotherapy tape (and documents) to three members of the Counseling Psychology Faculty.

b. The presentation will last two hours.

c. The presentation will begin with the playing of the entire tape and this will be followed by questions from faculty members about the tape, the overall case, and the submitted materials.

6) Transcript: In preparing the transcript, the student will do the following:

a. Use the term Client (or C) to indicate the client talking

b. Use the term Therapist (or T) to indicate the therapist talking

c. Number the lines (a student can number a line or a comment or the set of exchanges, but there must be numbers to aid faculty in evaluation and discussion); Word will number lines by selecting [Page Layout] and then [Line Number] and students should be sure to number pages within the document

d. Omit names of individuals by assigning pseudonyms (although letters can be used, if there will be more than two pseudonyms, please make up names to make it easier for faculty to track the people involved in the content of the session but also protect the identity of clients)

7) Written materials: Students will use pseudonyms on written materials and ensure that the materials are sufficiently disguised. Often, specific charges for individuals involved in the criminal justice system should not be listed. Instead, general categories may be useful (e.g., drug offenses, assaults, property crimes, serious misdemeanors). Similarly, exact dates in general, regardless of the client, should not be given. Specific schools, cities, or locations should not be named for any client. The written materials should conform to the title of the sections (use headings) outlined below under the Evaluation section. Students should also attend to and ensure quality of writing as poor editing, lack of clarity, and grammatical errors will result in required revisions.

8) Evaluation: Students will be rated on each of the written requirements and the therapy skill demonstration. Students will receive a consensus “summary” grade of either High Pass, Pass, Pass with Conditions, or Fail on each section of the written materials (as outlined below) and therapy skill demonstrated (as evidenced through the tape and/or transcript). The Psychotherapy Project Evaluation Form will be used to document the faculty’s evaluation of the student’s performance. If no consensus is reached, a vote will be taken. Students will be informed within two weeks of their overall score on the project. Students are reminded that irrespective of their performance on the various subsections, unethical conduct demonstrated in the tape or revealed by the discussion will result in failure on the project and require corrective action. At the same time, however, faculty are mindful of the distinction between unethical conduct and developmental error.

In addition to the session transcript, the required written materials include the following sections using the identified headings (typed and double spaced), which should not exceed 22 pages (not including references, tables, and the transcript):

1) Client Presentation: A two-four page summary of the client’s presenting complaint, co-morbid conditions, relevant environmental factors and cultural variables, and other individual differences (e.g., sexual orientation, gender, disability conditions, etc.) which are relevant to understanding the client.

2) Assessment and Diagnosis: A two-three page summary of assessment and diagnosis, including relevant DSM categories and cultural considerations in assessment and diagnosis of the client.

3) Conceptualization and Treatment: A two-four page theory-driven conceptualization of the client that incorporates cultural factors. You should articulate an approach to effectively working with the specific diversity issues presented by the client. In addition, this section must include a description of how the theory/theories and conceptualization influenced treatment of the client. Specific examples of how theory was implemented in sessions should be included. As a part of this, the theory/theories in this section should match what is present in the work demonstrated within the tape.

4) Scholarly Literature: A three-page description of scholarly literature bearing on the presenting (or treated if they are different) conditions. This section must specifically address evidence-based practice (and empirically supported treatments where applicable) and must demonstrate an awareness of how science and practice can and should be integrated. There are numerous published articles that may be helpful. One of them, by Dr. Nancy Murdock, is entitled “On Science-Practice Integration in Everyday Life,” TCP, 2006. You may also find it helpful to review a number of the cases published in an on-line journal which highlights what is called the pragmatic case study method. In general, reading a number of different journals which publish case presentations is likely to be beneficial, even if no particular published structure is followed.

5) Strengths and Weaknesses: A two-page summary of your strengths and weaknesses as a therapist that were demonstrated in this tape (provide the session number with this) and of which you became more aware as a result of reflecting on the case. Comments should include ones addressing what you would do differently in hindsight. Please also specifically address why you selected this tape to highlight your competence as a therapist.

6) Outcome Summary: A two-three page overall summary of the outcome of therapy with this client, including specific data documenting the client’s progress. You must document that you have made progress with the client and should be sure to evaluate your progress using appropriate methods (students should evaluate whether change is reliable). The data documenting client’s progress (and therapy outcomes) must include data beyond that collected by a practicum site as a matter of policy (at the site). For example, if a site requires all clients to complete measure X every three sessions, the student can use measure X as one set of data but must also collect other data to document the client’s progress. Examples of outcome measures may include diagnosis-specific measures (e.g., Beck Depression Inventory – II; PTSD Checklist; Eating Disorder Inventory III) or measures designed to assess clinical concerns that are the target of treatment but may or may not be a diagnosis (e.g., measures of self-esteem, body image, perfectionism, alexithymia). Students may also use behavioral data obtained through daily behavioral logs or other objective behavioral data (e.g., a client who presents with depressive symptoms and is at risk for failing classes due to lack of attendance could be asked to track number of classes attended and missed each week during therapy). Standardized clinical tests may also be used (e.g., MMPI-2). Students may find online resources like PROMIS and APA’s measurement database (access to details may require APA-membership) to be helpful in selecting instruments. You must also document that you can use outcome data to guide your clinical work. As such, you should note changes you made or plan to make to interventions when outcome data indicate that progress is not occurring. Essentially, you must demonstrate that your treatment is informed by outcomes.

For any student who receives a rating of Pass with Conditions or Fail on any section, the student’s overall rating must be either a Pass with Conditions or Fail until the faculty believe the section has been appropriately improved to receive a rating of Pass. For any student who receives an overall rating of Pass with Conditions or Fail, examining faculty members will direct a plan which they believe best responds to the shortcomings. Such a plan may include, but is not limited to, directing the student to choose a new client and submit new materials, directing that the student obtain additional outcome data, directing that some or all of the materials be revised and re-submitted, and/or directing that the student present a new therapy session with the client. After creation of the plan, students will be given a reasonable timeframe within which revisions must be completed, not to be less than 2 weeks. If the student fails to pass on the second examination, or fails to successfully carry out the plan outlined by the faculty, a recommendation of remediation or dismissal will be made to the student’s committee (or to the Counseling Psychology Faculty if a doctoral committee has not yet been formed). No student may take the oral examination for the advancement to doctoral candidacy (the one required by the Graduate School) prior to successfully completing this project.

IV. Competency Portfolio
The overall goal of the portfolio is to help the faculty assess the professional skills (to evaluate competence) of the student, to also to give students an opportunity to reflect on their strengths and weaknesses as a therapist and psychologist-in-training, and to document students’ readiness for internship in areas of intervention, group therapy, professionalism, and communication/interpersonal skills. It is the student’s responsibility to be sure that his/her/zer selected practicum placement will allow for the demonstration of clinical skills and mastery in a way that fits within these requirements. This requirement applies to individuals who entered the program during or after Fall, 2017. Students who entered the program prior to that point can opt into this requirement.

This document outlines the requirements for a competency portfolio which was created as part of an overall revision of the written portion of the preliminary examination to achieve the above-stated goals. The portfolio consists of: submission of all Practicum/Program Approved Clinical Experience (PACE) Student Evaluation Forms from the semester immediately preceding the term in which the student completes the competency portfolio, submission of the Group Therapy Student Competency Evaluation Form, and submission of the Student Professionalism Skills Summary Form to program faculty. Faculty will then complete the Professional Skills Rating Form, in which students must meet all requirements for competence before they can proceed to the Oral Exam.

Requirements:

1) Deadline: Students must submit their competency portfolio (with all three parts) to the faculty no later than one year after the completion of their psychotherapy project and no earlier than they date they pass the psychotherapy project.

2) General Contents of Competency Portfolio: By the deadline date, students are to provide either in printed or emailed pdf (all components must be submitted in the same format):

a. Copies of the site supervisor evaluation forms to the core faculty. Specifically, the students must provide his/her/zer most recent Practicum/Program Approved Clinical Experience (PACE) Student Evaluation Forms. If the student has completed more than one qualifying experience that requires such forms (students should consult with faculty regarding whether forms are requires and faculty provide feedback on which experiences requires such forms at the start of each term), all forms must be submitted and ratings on all forms must meet the established criteria for readiness for internship.

b. A copy of the Group Therapy Student Competency Evaluation Form completed by the qualified psychologist who supervised his/her/zer group experience. If students completed multiple group experiences, they are expected to use the most recent evaluation.

c. The Student Professionalism Skills Summary Form.

3) Passing requires the following:

a. Supervisor Evaluation of Clinical Skill [i.e., intervention component]: For the purpose of further demonstrating competency in provision of Psychological Interventions (in addition to the Psychotherapy Project, students who enter the program during or after Fall, 2017 will be required to provide all evaluation forms completed by the site supervisors from the semester immediately preceding the submission of the competency portfolio. Passing of the competency portfolio will require that the student has ratings of “consistent with some prior clinical experience” or better from all supervisors who completed the Practicum/Program Approved Clinical Experience PACE) Evaluation Form the semester immediately preceding the submission of the competency portfolio. The forms must be completed by a licensed psychologist that either live- or video-observed the student’s work. Until a student can satisfy this requirement, the competency portfolio cannot be passed. Should a student not be able to meet this requirement by the deadline (within one year of passing the psychotherapy project), the student will have two additional semesters, constituting two additional evaluation periods, to meet the requirement (including the semester in which the student completed the portfolio). If, after two additional evaluation periods, the student has not met the requirement, the student will have to redo the psychotherapy project with a new client and may be required to complete a remediation plan in which faculty specify a course to help the student successfully demonstrate competence on the portfolio.

b. Supervisor Evaluation of Group Therapy Skill [i.e., group therapy component]: For the purpose of demonstrating competency in the provision of Group Therapy, students who enter the program during or after Fall, 2017 will be required to provide an evaluation of their skills in providing group psychotherapy using the Group Therapy Student Competency Evaluation Form. The form must be completed by a supervising licensed psychologist who observed (either as a co-therapist, through live observation, or through videotaped observation) their provision of group psychotherapy. To pass the competency portfolio, the student must have received ratings in all skill domains that are “consistent with some prior clinical experience” or better from the qualified (i.e., licensed psychologist who observed the work) supervisor who completed the form. Should a student not be able to meet this requirement by the deadline for the competency portfolio, the evaluating faculty will recommend that the student’s committee develop a remediation plan to ensure the student will be able to meet the requirement. The plan should include placement in a setting where the student can provide group therapy and be evaluated on their competency in provision of Group Therapy. The psychotherapy project cannot be passed until students have met this requirement.

c. Professional Skills Ratings [i.e., professionalism component]: The student must submit a completed self-evaluation and summary of their professional skills (using the Student Professionalism Skills Summary Form). The faculty will then use the Professional Skills Rating Form. To pass the competency portfolio, students must be rated as competent in all areas.

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Policy Statement #6: Due Process, Process of Remediation, and Process of Dismissal

If a counseling psychology student has established a doctoral advisory committee, procedures concerning due process and dismissal shall be those established by The Graduate School, and described in the link to “Academic Progress,” and to “Annual Evaluation of Graduate Teaching Assistants and Doctoral Students” (The information posted on these websites is also copied below, after the next two full paragraphs.) At any stage of due process, the Counseling Psychology Faculty may, and generally will make, recommendations to a student’s advisory committee concerning remediation, statements of grievance, and/or dismissal. Students should be aware that when committee members are not tenure/tenure- track faculty at Auburn University, retire, or assume positions at other academic institutions, they are not (or no longer in the case of retirement and transfer to other academic institutions) among committee members who can make decisions regarding progress and dismissal; however, such committee members can continue to offer input to the remaining committee members.

If a doctoral advisory committee has not been established, then the policy described above shall be operative, except that the Counseling Psychology Faculty shall assume all roles ascribed to the doctoral advisory committee in the document.

Consistent with the policy published by the Graduate School, and consistent with the Program’s philosophy, students may be removed from the program for either failing to meet academic standards or for failing to progress satisfactorily in professional or personal development. Note that even though the title of the posted Graduate School statement (see below) uses the words “academic progress,” the elaboration which follows clearly states that “issues of professional and personal development may be considered;” see also Program Policy Statement #5—Evaluation of Counseling Psychology Students, for examples of dimensions along which student behavior may be evaluated.

EVALUATING THE ACADEMIC PROGRESS OF GRADUATE STUDENTS
(from the Auburn Bulletin)

Grades
To receive a graduate degree at Auburn University, a student must earn a cumulative GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale on all courses carrying graduate credit. No more than nine hours beyond the student’s Plan of Study is allowed in obtaining the cumulative graduate GPA (CGGPA). No grade below C (including unsatisfactory grades for courses taken under the S/U option) is acceptable for credit toward a graduate degree. Each graduate course in which a grade below C is received must be repeated at Auburn University whether or not it is listed on the student’s Plan of Study. Both the original grade and the grade for the repeated course will be counted in calculating the CGGPA. Course credits transferred from another institution may not be used to satisfy this requirement. Courses retaken will not count against the nine-hour limit beyond the student’s Plan of Study in obtaining the minimum CGGPA.

Academic Standing
Only grades in Auburn University courses approved for graduate credit will be used in determining the overall GPA for continuation in the Graduate School. If at the end of any semester the cumulative graduate GPA (CGGPA) falls below 3.0, the student will be placed on academic probation. If the CGGPA remains below 3.0 after the next eleven credit hours of graduate enrollment (both graded and ungraded) or two consecutive terms (whichever comes first), the student will be placed on academic suspension.* Students on academic suspension may not hold a graduate assistantship. The student may be readmitted only after completion of a remediation plan recommended by the academic unit and approved by the Dean of the Graduate School. Course work taken as part of the remediation plan must be completed within two consecutive terms and may count toward both the student’s degree and CGGPA with the recommendation of the department head and the approval of the graduate dean.* Upon completion of the remediation plan, the student must have addressed academic deficiencies and have a CGGPA of 3.0 or above. Once approved by the graduate dean, remediation plans may not be amended or extended beyond the original deadline. If a student fails to complete the remediation plan as approved or if the student earns a grade of C or below while completing the remediation plan, the student will be dismissed from the Graduate School and the designation ACADEMIC DISMISSAL will be placed on the student’s official record.

*The summer term is counted as one of the consecutive semesters only if a student is enrolled during the summer term.

Advisors
The dean of the Graduate School is the general counselor to all graduate students. A faculty advisor or major professor will be designated for each student in accordance with departmental policy. There also will be an advisory committee for each student. The major professor generally serves as the chair of the advisory committee. In the case of co-chairs, at least one must be a member of the graduate faculty at the appropriate level at Auburn University. Some required forms and reports regarding the student’s program must be approved by the major professor, advisory committee, department head or chair and the dean of the Graduate School. Students should ascertain which signatures must be obtained.

Academic and Professional Progress
Monitoring the academic progress of graduate students and graduate teaching assistants on a regular basis is important to their success and to the success of Auburn’s graduate programs. The Graduate School requires that each department conduct — at least on an annual basis — an evaluation of the progress of each graduate student enrolled in a doctoral program and each

Graduate Teaching Assistant (GTA). Departments are also encouraged to monitor the progress of all other degree-seeking students. Annually, each department will report to the Graduate School, confirming that the evaluation of all doctoral students and GTAs has been completed.

The student’s advisory committee monitors each graduate student’s progress toward a degree, and issues of professional and personal development may be considered. While failure to maintain academic standards is reason for dismissal, a student also may be dismissed from the Graduate School if progress is unsatisfactory in other areas.

In such cases, the advisory committee will prepare a statement of grievance and discuss it in a meeting with the student. The statement must have the unanimous support of all members of the committee. The student will be warned that corrective measures must be taken within a specified time to avoid action that might result in dismissal. The committee determines the period allowed for correction. Copies of the statement of grievance and summary of the meeting will be provided to the student, the department head/chair, and the academic dean.
If the deficiency is not corrected within the time allowed by the committee, a statement reiterating the grievance and recommending dismissal should be sent to the graduate dean with copies to the student, the department head/chair, and the academic dean.

The graduate dean will give the student an opportunity to respond and will make a final determination. The student and the advisory committee will be notified.

The action taken will not appear on the student’s official transcript, and release of information is restricted under the University’s policy on the confidentiality of student records.

Annual Evaluation of Graduate Teaching Assistants and Doctoral Students
(As outlined by the Auburn Bulletin)

Policy: Effective beginning Fall 2014, the Graduate School will require that each department conduct — at least on an annual basis — an evaluation of the progress of each Graduate Teaching Assistant (GTA) and each graduate student enrolled in a doctoral program.

Reporting: Annually, each department will report to the Graduate School, confirming that the evaluation of all GTAs and doctoral students has been completed. In addition, the department will provide the Graduate School with a summary report of all instances in which a GTA or doctoral student has received an unsatisfactory review.

Expectations: Each department will be responsible for developing procedures (if not already in place) for the annual evaluation of the progress of GTAs and doctoral students. Following guidelines for best practices, the review should include at least the following:

• A student self-report and assessment of academic progress; teaching (if applicable); and research (if applicable) [prepared in advance of the review conference];

• A report prepared by the student’s advisor (and preferably at least one other faculty member, e.g., a member of the student’s advisory committee) that assesses the student’s academic progress; teaching (if applicable); and research (if applicable) that identifies strengths and weaknesses, and establishes expectations for the next year. The report may be augmented by reports from teaching supervisors or other members of the student’s advisory committee.

• An opportunity for the student to discuss the report in person.

• A signed copy of the written assessment should be placed in the student’s file and a copy given to the student.

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Policy Statement #7: Respect for Diversity

Because counseling psychologists often work with individuals who have been marginalized, it is imperative that those who aspire to the PhD in counseling psychology hold respect for diversity and strive to contribute to an interpersonal environment of safety and respect for all individuals. Respect for, and the valuing of, diversity is expected of all students who are accepted into the program. In particular, the program expects that students will be respectful and supportive of all individuals (including, but not limited to, clients, classmates, students, staff, and faculty), including those who are different from themselves in terms of age, culture, disability, ethnicity, gender identity, language, national origin, race, religious preference, sex, sexual orientation, veteran status, or socioeconomic status.

Standards for student behavior exceed the idea of “non-discrimination.” Faculty in the program believe the most effective training environment involves an openness to learning about others who are different from themselves, acceptance of diversity, and actions that foster inclusion. When students encounter others who differ from them on one or more identity status, it is the assumption of the program that students will work to help create a climate of safety and trust for all concerned. Faculty recognize that no one is completely free from all forms of prejudice and bias. Furthermore, it is expected that there will be a range of attitudes and values concerning controversial issues. Nonetheless, enrollment in the program is seen as a commitment to the valuing of diversity and the process of self-examination so that bias can be evaluated in the light of both scientific data and the traditions of cooperation and mutual respect. In addition, this program strives to develop counseling psychologists who will actively work toward correcting social injustices by engaging in advocacy and/or activism for and with marginalized groups.

Prospective students who have reservations about their ability to show acceptance of diversity in all the demographic areas listed above should understand that the program, while committed to supporting the positive personal development of all enrolled students, will not support behaviors which are judged by the faculty to be highly intolerant and/or that create a hostile environment for others. Examples of behaviors that can create a hostile environment include, but are not limited to: using derogatory terms, insults, telling derogatory jokes, taunting, and intimidation. Faculty will consider the context, nature, scope, frequency, duration, and severity of incidents to determine whether a student has created a hostile environment. Similarly, although the program will take no action to abridge one’s constitutional right of free speech, tolerance and respect for the values of others are factors which may be used to evaluate students. Students and prospective students found to have violated this Policy Statement will be subject to policies related to remediation and dismissal.

Drawing from the recommendations set forth by the APA Board of Educational Affairs, we as a program are committed to developing psychologists with the knowledge, skills, and attitudes to be able to work effectively with members of the public who embody intersecting demographics, attitudes, beliefs, and values. Students will, in the course of their training, inevitably encounter clients who are from different cultures, who hold different values from them, who are of different sexual orientations, etc. When graduate students’ attitudes, beliefs, or values create tensions that negatively impact the training process or their ability to effectively work with members of the public, the program faculty and supervisors are committed to a developmental training approach designed to support the acquisition of professional competence. Professional competencies are determined by the profession for the benefit and protection of the public; consequently, students do not have the option to avoid working with particular client populations or refuse to develop professional competencies because of conflicts with their attitudes, beliefs, or values. We will support graduate students in finding a belief- or value-congruent path that will allow them to work in a professionally competent manner with all individuals.

Students are required to honor not merely the Ethics Code of the American Psychological Association (APA; see Policy #1), but also to be familiar with and to abide by the various Guidelines published by the APA for working with individuals from marginalized groups. In addition, students are encouraged to access the website for the Auburn University Office of Inclusion and Diversity for details on university expectations and priorities with regard to diversity, multiculturalism, and inclusion.

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Policy Statement #8: Policy on Discrimination and Harassment

It is the policy of the Counseling Psychology Program that students not be treated differently or unfairly as a function of sexual orientation, race/ethnicity, national origin, age, sex, religious preference, or disability. The Counseling Psychology Faculty also strongly emphasizes its commitment to students to protect them from sexual harassment. In particular, if you believe that an individual, especially one holding power over you (whether at a practicum site, or at an off-campus assistantship site, or at the university) has discriminated against you based on dimensions listed above, or has used sexual language or behavior in a way that is upsetting to you, you are encouraged to report this fact to any of the following: your advisor, the Director of the Program, the Department Head, or if enrolled in practicum, your university supervisor. If you do not feel comfortable discussing the issue with any of the above, you also have the option of talking with any faculty member in whom you have greater trust, or contacting the Office for Auburn University Affirmative Action/Equal Employment Opportunity. If you are working as a Graduate Teaching Assistant, you may also contact the University Ombudsperson. The Counseling Psychology Program Faculty are committed to honoring the student’s preferences regarding our level of involvement. Specifically, we support students meeting individually with the AA/EEO Office (or the Title IX Office) or with faculty support present at the student’s request.

When a problem is reported, the Counseling Psychology Faculty affirms its commitment to giving students maximum control over the extent to which they wish to pursue their potential complaint and the type of action which they want taken. The chief exception to this rule is if the report also includes information about harassment or other mistreatment of clients or minors. In this case, the faculty may be forced to act when provided with evidence. Furthermore, under certain conditions, responsible faculty members may be legally obligated to report issues of potential discrimination. Nonetheless, the faculty will, whenever possible, honor requests that information be kept confidential. It is important to remember than in cases involving harassment or discrimination, several small incidents may, in combination, make a much stronger case. Therefore, both for your own sake as well as for the welfare of your peers, we ask that you report any such incidents. Even if you are absolutely sure you do not wish to pursue a complaint, we would very much appreciate your informing us. As indicated above, we will work with you to ensure your safety and wishes. The typical pattern of abusers is to offend more than one person over a period of time. Unfortunately, students may not personally know of others who have been harassed, and therefore may feel isolated. If all incidents are reported, the faculty is in a much better position to take definitive action, perhaps even in cases where you wondered if there was sufficient cause to move forward with a complaint. People who abuse others count on silence to guarantee their ability to continue their abuse. We encourage you, to the extent you are able, to help us prevent this from occurring.

In addition to this Program Policy, the University has policies concerning discrimination and sexual harassment. The Program’s policy is in addition to, and not intended to replace, University policies.

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Policy Statement #9: Filing Academic Grievances

The Student Policy eHandbook for Auburn University students, details the process for filing academic grievances against faculty members and administrators. The particular section of the handbook which addresses this process is found at the same as the section on discrimination and harassment. The counseling psychology faculty affirms its commitment to assisting students who have academic grievances.

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Policy Statement #10: Guidelines for the Exemption of Courses

I. The Philosophy

The Counseling Psychology Faculty at Auburn University places high priority on students completing a strong and comprehensive curriculum as part of their training. The program publishes a list of required courses (see Policy #15 and the list posted to the web). Students who have previously completed courses elsewhere may be eligible to exempt required courses in the Auburn program. The Graduate School allows a maximum of 30 hours to be transferred into a doctoral program. The Graduate School maintains requirements for a minimum number of hours (to be completed at Auburn University) required for all Ph.D. students at Auburn., but this minimum falls far below the number of hours completed by Counseling Psychology students at Auburn University, even by students exempting a number of courses. The emphasis in the exemption process will be not merely on whether the student has had a similar course but on ensuring that the student performed well (not less than a grade of `B”) in a course which provided the student with a solid graduate-level background in the area under consideration. Practicum, contemporary issues in counseling psychology, professional seminars in counseling psychology, supervision, advanced theories, and elective courses may not be exempted. In general, students will not substitute in more than eight courses (24 credit hours). In unique circumstances, a student may be eligible to substitute up to the 30 hour limit should careful review of the request and prior coursework by program faculty suggest an exception is appropriate.

II. The Process

If a student wishes to exempt a course on the basis of having completed a similar course elsewhere, the student should first discuss this request with his or her advisor. The Counseling Psychology Program Director may also be consulted informally at this stage; however, it is the advisor who is central to the process. If the advisor is supportive of the exemption application, the student will complete the Course Exemption Request Form for each course and upload it to Qualtrics. The student should upload materials for all courses that s/he wishes the faculty to examine for substitution. The student will also notify the advisor that course substitutions are ready for review. In general, the faculty will review course substitutions at the first faculty meeting following September 15 and February 15 of each year. Students who submit substitution forms after those dates may need to wait until the next review cycle. Any student who has outstanding course substitution requests should alert their advisor to the status of the request on September 14 and February 14 of each year (students are required to make notice to the advisor on those dates even if prior notice has been made). The advisor will review the materials submitted in Qualtrics. If the advisor approves the course substitution, the advisor will notify the Program Director for final approval or disapproval to be completed at the next faculty meeting. The Program Director will then make a judgment as to whether the course may be exempted. If either the advisor or the Program Director is in doubt as to whether the course should be exempted, he/she may consult with another faculty member with expertise in the subject matter under discussion. The decision may be arrived at through a number of possible mechanisms, including the following:

1. Considering the quality of the institutional department where the course was taken.

2. Discussing with the student the content of the course as it was taken elsewhere. This can including asking students content-based questions about the course content (see number 6).

3. Examining course syllabi, textbook(s), and other materials relating to the course as it was taken elsewhere.

4. Discussing the credentials of the faculty member who taught the course elsewhere.

5. Consultation with other faculty as appropriate.

6. Written and/or oral exam.

III. The Criteria

In considering whether a course will be exempted, the following general guidelines will be applied:

1. It is preferable that the course have been taken in a department that offers the doctoral degree. In any event, courses should clearly be identified as graduate ones; courses which are cross listed as graduate AND undergraduate may NOT be used.

2. Ordinarily, the course should not have been taken more than five years prior to the student’s enrollment in the Counseling Psychology Program at Auburn University.

3. The student received a grade of not less than “B” in the course taken elsewhere. Courses which students have taken on a “pass-fail” basis at another institution may not be used to substitute for a required course at Auburn.

The responsibility for initiating the exemption process rests with the student. All requests for exemptions must be initiated not later than the beginning of the second semester of study at Auburn University. The student’s advisor should ensure that completed Course Exemption Request Forms are filed in the student’s departmental folder.

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Policy Statement #11: Doctoral Classification

Students admitted to the doctoral program in Counseling Psychology will be classified as a ‘9′ — a doctoral-level student. This is true for both students admitted with a Master’s degree, as well as those who enter without having previously earned a Master’s degree. Classification as a “doctoral student” should not be confused with the status, “Doctoral Candidate,” which is the term used for students after they pass the General Oral Examination.

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Policy Statement #12: Composition of Doctoral Committee

(Also, see Policy #17–Advisors.) It is preferable that students form an Advisory Committee and submit a plan of study in their first year of graduate work. The Advisory Committee must be formed prior to the taking of the general oral examination (the oral portion of the comprehensive examination). Because students are assigned a faculty advisor upon entry into the program, because such assignments are not made with comprehensive input from the student, and because students often change the focus of their research interests while in graduate school, the faculty affirms its commitment to allowing students to change advisors should they prefer to do so at any reasonable time. Such changes depend on the availability of a qualified person to become the new advisor. The following are the requirements for the
make-up of the Doctoral Committee:

1. The student’s Doctoral Committee will be made up of at least four members (students forming a committee prior to 2012 and who are in good standing are subject to the previous policy of the graduate school which required that the Doctoral Committee be made up of at least three members), one of whom will be the student’s advisor. At least one member of the committee must be a member of the Counseling Psychology Faculty. Almost always, at least two members of the committee will be members of the COP faculty.

2. The chairperson of the committee (i.e., normally the student’s advisor) will ordinarily be a member of the Counseling Psychology Faculty. The Committee may be chaired by a person who is not a member of the Counseling Psychology Faculty if the student’s dissertation interests are closely related to those of a well-qualified person (not a member of the Counseling Psychology Faculty) available to supervise the work. If students wish to consider a person who is not a member of the Counseling Psychology (COP) Faculty as their dissertation chairperson, this requires approval by the COP faculty. In such cases the person must hold graduate faculty status at Auburn University and be recognized as a tenure/tenure track faculty member who is an employee of Auburn University.

3. Additional members of the committee may come from either the Department or another academic department. If the student wishes to have a person on the committee who does not hold a regular tenure-track position at Auburn University, this individual must be added as a fourth or fifth person on the committee. At least three members must hold graduate faculty status and continuous appointment as faculty to the university. Students should be aware that the graduate school may impose additional requirements regarding the credentials of committee members.

4. If a committee chairperson leaves the university prior to the student’s submitting the draft version of their dissertation to the graduate school, the Counseling Psychology Faculty, must approve continuation in the role as chairperson.

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Policy Statement #13: Internship

The internship experience is designed to be an opportunity for the student to work as a service provider while under supervision and represents one of the final steps in the student’s training. The internship is a one-year full-time experience usually beginning in the summer or fall, and it almost always requires geographic re-location on the part of the student. It is the responsibility of students, in consultation with their advisors and the Director of Training, to apply for and select an internship which has high training standards and which will offer training consistent with the student’s professional goals. Students are strongly encouraged to apply for and accept APA-accredited internships. It is important to understand that certain agencies will not hire psychologists who have not completed an APA-accredited internship. Furthermore, some states may make it relatively difficult to obtain a psychology license if the applicant did not complete such an internship. Because there may be long-term financial and professional consequences to internship site placement, students should consult with their advisor and with the Director of the Counseling Psychology Program prior to applying for or accepting an internship which is not APA-accredited. If an internship is not APA-accredited, as a minimum it must be a member of the Association of Psychology Postdoctoral and Internship Centers (APPIC).

In addition, APA requires that programs ensure students who attend sites that are not APA accredited receive training of quality equal to that offered at APA-accredited sites. Students wishing to apply to sites that do not have APA-accreditation must submit sufficient documentation to demonstrate that quality of training would be equal to that obtained at an APA-accredited site. Students should examine APA-policies, standards, and regulations for accredited internships and must provide documentation to faculty that the program conforms to such policies, standards, and regulations. As a part of this, students will provide outcome data on the internship site. Information on outcome data that APA requires internship sites to provide can be found on the American Psychological Association website. Such information may include statements of program competencies, how interns are evaluated with regard to the competencies, licensure, and alumni survey data. At a minimum, this information must include information on (a) the nature and appropriateness of the training activities, (b) the frequency and quality (including credentials of supervisors) of supervision, (c) how the internship evaluates student performance, (d) how interns demonstrate competency at the appropriate level, and € how the site documents the evaluation of its students in its students files. You may have to contact the internship site to get this information. Students will be required to present this information to faculty for review at least three weeks prior to the application deadline for that program. Faculty have the right to request additional information as needed to render a decision regarding the quality equivalence of an internship site. The faculty will make a decision regarding whether or not the student is supported in applying to the program. Students should be aware that if they attend an internship that is not accredited, APPIC policies prevent the student from doing a second internship.

Approximately one year prior to the anticipated beginning of the internship, students should begin collecting information from sites in which they may be interested. Potential internship sites may be identified by examining the American Psychologist (which annually lists internship sites accredited by the American Psychological Association), and by consulting the APPIC Directory (information concerning APPIC sites is available on-line). Faculty are also able to assist students in identifying potential internship sites. Internship sites maintain websites which may be consulted. Counseling Psychology students (and graduates) from Auburn who have previously completed an internship are excellent sources of information. The APPIC website lists many resources helpful in the application process, including listservs to which the student may subscribe.

Application deadlines range from October to January, although most are in November and December. Application formats may vary slightly, but there are standard APPIC forms used by sites that are part of the on-line application. Members of the Counseling Psychology Faculty will assist students by giving feedback, when requested, on vitae preparation, etc. Students must make internship application though APPIC, which uses a computer matching system. Their deadline for registering is generally around December 1 of each year. Internship applicants learn whether they have been matched, and if so with which site, in February or March. Application through the on-line application system and registration for the match, both carry fees that students are responsible for paying. Students must submit a final copy of their application and list of sites to which they applied to the Training Director not later than December 15 of the year they apply to internship.

The Director of Training is required to complete an Internship Readiness Form (which gets submitted to each site to which the student is applying) for all internship applicants. If there is any question about whether a particular student should be endorsed for internship, the Director may consult with the Counseling Psychology Faculty, who in turn may make recommendations about the student’s readiness (or not) for internship. The Director of Training will not indicate any individual as ready for internship who has not met the following program requirements

a) Passed the general oral exam on or before October 1 of the year the student makes application to internship (note, this means that the general oral examination must be completed by October 1 the year prior to the year the student starts internship). This also requires completion of the written exams and psychotherapy project, both of which must be passed prior to the general oral examination (see specific policies on requirements to move to the general oral examination for each of these requirements).

b) For students entering during or after the fall term of 2013, they must have successfully proposed their dissertation prior to the Training Director certifying them as ready for internship.

c) For students entering during or after the fall term of 2015, they must have held their dissertation proposal meeting not later than October 1st of the year the student makes application to internship (note, this means that the student must have had their dissertation proposal meeting prior to October 1 of the year prior to the year the student starts internship). Students who are required to make changes prior to being deemed to have passed the proposal must make those changes and pass prior to applying to internship and the Training Director will not certify them as ready for internship until the advisor provides written documentation that the proposal is approved.

d) Will be able to complete course requirements prior to starting internship (the Director of Training must carefully consider the remaining coursework requirements for the student and the schedule of course offerings and will not approve as ready for internship any student who would be unable to complete required coursework prior to August of the internship year).

Internship sites vary in their application process, but many choose a limited number of applicants to whom they offer an interview. Students should make every effort to interview at all sites where they are offered an interview and in which they are seriously interested.

It should be emphasized that internships are very competitive, and there is no guarantee that a student will receive an offer from a particular site, nor in fact can the program guarantee that all students will be offered an internship. Students are encouraged to send out a number of applications and to consult with their advisor and the Director of Training concerning the number of applications to send out. At Auburn University, the typical student sends out 10–15 applications.

As a reminder: the internship may not begin until after the student has successfully completed (1) all coursework; (2) the doctoral written examination (at times called “prelims” or the “comprehensive examination”); (3) the psychotherapy project which is considered a part of the written prelims; (4) the general oral examination; and (5) passed the dissertation proposal (for students who entered during or after the fall term of 2013). Students should note that, regardless of the year they entered, numbers 2-4 must be completed satisfactorily before the student can apply to internship. There are additional requirements related to applying for internship which are listed below.

Guidelines for Applying to Internship
Effective Spring of 2014 for all students in the program regardless of year of entry: All students must apply to internship no later than their 7th year in the program (through APPIC as described above). Any student who has not applied to internship by the end of their seventh year (using the APPIC system) will be recommended for dismissal from the program. Any student who has not matched by the end of their 7th year will be placed on remediation in order to facilitate successful application in their 8th year. Such a plan will be specifically designed to help correct any deficits or weaknesses that interfere with the student’s ability to successfully compete for an internship. Students who do not meet the requirements of the remediation plan will be recommended for dismissal.

All students applying for internship must have doctoral candidacy (meaning they passed the general oral examination) prior to October 1st. Students who reach candidacy after that date will need to wait until the following year to apply to internship.

For students entering during or after the fall term of 2013, the student must successfully propose their dissertation (with approval from the committee to move forward with data collection prior to submission of internship applications). Students who have a proposal meeting where the committee determines a need for significant changes in design and to review the changes will not be considered as having fulfilled this requirement to support their application to internship. Students who entered the program during or after August of 2013 will not receive a recommendation that they are ready for internship as a part of their application until they have passed their oral exam and successfully proposed their dissertation. In addition, for students entering during or after the fall term of 2015, the student must have their proposal meeting on or before October 1st or they will not be permitted to apply for internship. For students who apply prior to defense of their dissertation, the student’s advisor must send a copy of the proposal to the Training Director, and that copy will be added to the student’s file.

For students entering the program prior to the fall term of 2013, successful completion of the dissertation proposal is strongly encouraged, but not required, prior to application for internship. Students are strongly encouraged to finish their dissertation, or as a minimum, have their proposal accepted, before leaving for internship. In addition, many internship sites require students to have successfully proposed their dissertation prior to beginning the internship, prior to submitting ranking for the match system, or even prior to the site’s application deadline. Most sites require the student to have passed oral exams prior to application. Students who entered the program before August of 2013 will not receive a recommendation that they are ready for internship as a part of their application until they have passed their oral exam.

While preparing in the fall to apply for internship for the following year, students must enroll in COUN 8800, which is a course designed to assist them in preparing high-quality internship application materials. Due to the extremely competitive national application process, students must invest substantial time and effort in internship application. Typically, students will enroll in the course during the fall term in which they are applying. When students take the course in advance (with the intention of delaying application to internship), students will be required to maintain contact with the Training Director during the term in which they intend to apply to internship to ensure that the Training Director is sufficiently able to review and certify hours and other application materials. Taking the course in advance of application is generally discouraged (as the course is designed to maximally beneficial when taken in conjunction with the application to internship).

While on internship, students will enroll in COUN 8930 (Internship). This is a non-credit course which requires a very minimum payment. It is the student’s responsibility to register for this course each semester while on internship. The Office of Financial Aid is willing to certify that a student is a full-time student while on internship. Therefore, students who have successfully defended their dissertation prior to going on internship may enroll in only this non- credit course (0 semester hours) and, as indicated above, pay a very minimum fee. Even though this is a non-credit course, it is graded S/U. Typically grades will be based on reports from the internship site; however, the final responsibility for assigning the grade rests with the faculty member who is the instructor of record for the course. The program does not guarantee that COUN 8930 (or its equivalent) will remain a zero-hour course.

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Policy Statement #14: Taking Courses at Other Universities After Admission To The Program

(Reference is made to Policy Statement #10, which outlines the procedure to follow to obtain credit for graduate work completed prior to entering the Counseling Psychology Program at Auburn University. The policy described below refers to situations in which students wish to take a graduate course for credit at another university after they have entered the doctoral program at Auburn.)

Counseling Psychology doctoral students must take a sequence of required courses at Auburn University. This means, among other things, that once students have begun their graduate work at Auburn University, all courses which are required should be taken at Auburn University (Auburn, Alabama). In order to respond to individual student concerns and needs, students, with the consent of their committee (or advisor if no committee has been assigned) may, when considering the list of required courses in the Auburn curriculum, take one acceptable course substitution at another university (that is, may take a substantially equivalent course at another university). The substitution must be for a comparable course and the course that is being used as a substitute must be clearly designated as a graduate-level course. That is, courses which are classified as undergraduate AND graduate-level are not appropriate. The advisor will examine a syllabus and other materials as deemed necessary and will consider the instructor of the course and the university and academic department in ascertaining whether there is substantial equivalency between the two courses. The course being used as a substitute in the context of this policy may not be an independent study. The substitution option does not apply to practicum or prepracticum. This policy is not meant to encourage substitutions. The required list of courses is constructed with a number of concerns in mind, including licensure. Although the program cannot ensure that students will be eligible for licensure in all states, and although advisors will not approve any substitution which in their view might make licensure problematic, substitutions may in fact produce a slight increase in the probability of a licensure problem. Students should discuss these potential risks with their advisor and/or the Director of Training prior to making a substitution. If the course under consideration is the biological basis of behavior course, the cognitive basis of behavior course, or the social basis of behavior course, substitution must be approved by the entire Counseling Psychology Faculty. Students who have a committee in place at the time they are considering pursuing this option must have the approval of their committee. Students are strongly encouraged not to use this option until and unless there are compelling reasons for the substitution. The advisor or student should inform the Director of Training of a substitution made under this policy. Students who complete such a course must ensure that a transcript or grade report is placed in their departmental file in order to document the fact that a satisfactory grade has been earned. Grades below a “B” will not be accepted.

Students should keep in mind that it is a University policy that if a graduate course is failed (a grade of “D” or “F”) at Auburn University, it must be retaken at Auburn University. Therefore, one cannot substitute a course taken at another university for any course failed at Auburn University.

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Policy Statement #15: Required Courses

The Program Faculty publishes a list of courses which are required of all students in the Counseling Psychology Program. These courses may vary by the areas of training the student wishes to emphasize, but all students must complete the required courses (either by substitution or by taking the specific Auburn University course) and required number of elective credit hours. Furthermore, subject to administrative constraints, the program will also publish the sequence in which the courses should be taken. Although the student’s advisory committee has the final responsibility for deciding whether a course will be required or not, the Counseling Psychology Faculty acknowledges by mutual agreement that courses published by the Program are required when published as such. Based on changes within the profession, departmental resources, and overall program goals, the Program Faculty will from time to time make changes in the list of required courses. Students will normally be afforded the opportunity to create or maintain a plan of study consistent with the requirements operative during their first semester of study. However, they will also be allowed to make changes in their previous plan of study to make it consistent with new requirements should they desire to do so.

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Policy Statement #16: Practicum and Externship or Other Program Approved Clinical Experiences

For policies and procedures concerning practicum, see the document entitled “Counseling Psychology at Auburn University: Practicum Guidelines.” Students are required to abide by these guidelines. Note that before you are assigned a grade at the end of each semester for which you are enrolled in practicum (grading is S/U), you must ensure that the evaluation form to be completed by your on-site supervisor has been submitted to your university instructor and Training Director through the mechanism specified by the Training Director (currently, this is done through TK20 and requires submitting information about your supervisor so that they can obtain the link), and must submit to the Training Director a listing of the clinical hours in a format that is deemed equivalent to the format used by APPIC through the mechanism specified by the Training Director. A rating of having violated ethical principles for psychologists is unacceptable and will result in a grade of “Unsatisfactory.” Additional constraints on ratings by supervisors are provided in Policy #23.

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Policy Statement #17: Advisor

Each student will be assigned an advisor upon entry into the program (also see Policy
#12–Composition of Doctoral Committee). Advisors are responsible for assisting students in a number of areas, including advice about elective courses which may prove professionally beneficial, information about administrative details, suggestions about dissertation topics where appropriate, providing explanations about program policies/procedures which are confusing in any way, and in general being supportive. The advisor is also a conduit between the student and the COP faculty, and advisors will bring to the faculty any suggestions you may have for improving the program. We encourage you to communicate frequently with your advisor and to use your advisor both for support and as a way of providing feedback about the program. Students may select another available advisor if they believe that it would be in their best professional interests to do so and if this change is supported by the anticipated new advisor. The most typical reason for changing advisors is that another faculty member’s research interests more closely parallel those of the student’s. We encourage students with small disagreements with their advisors to resolve these disagreements within the context of the advisor-advisee relationship. However, students may change advisors for any number of reasons and should generally feel free to do so. The Chairperson of the Doctoral Committee also serves as the Advisor except in unusual circumstances.

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Policy Statement #18: Use of Independent Studies to Substitute for Required Courses

Students may not substitute an independent study for a required course. Any exceptions to this policy will be extremely rare and must be justified by extraordinary circumstances and compelling argument. Exceptions must be approved by the entire Counseling Psychology Faculty.

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Policy Statement #19: Participation in the Program’s Student Organization

Students are required to be a member of the Program’s counseling psychology student organization. The organization (ACOPS) meets once each month during the academic year. Although students are allowed absences during the year, they are encouraged to attend all meetings. Students must attend at least 51% of the meetings of the organization each year (any exception to this will be rare and are generally only granted to students who have completed all program courses except the internship and dissertation). The meetings are relatively brief (typically lasting one hour) and are scheduled so as to avoid conflicts with classes. They serve as a venue for students to express concerns, to have input into the structure and process of the program, and to have questions answered about the program. They also serve as a mechanism for the distribution of information about the program and about on-going professional issues.

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Policy Statement #20: Intimate Relations with Students

The program endorses and calls attention to the Auburn University policy on intimate relations, which includes the stipulation that graduate teaching assistants are prohibited from pursuing or engaging in romantic or sexual relationships with students whom they are currently teaching or supervising. Furthermore, it is the policy of the program that all students in the program are prohibited from engaging in sexual relationships with supervisees. Engaging in a sexual relationship with a supervisee (or client) is a violation of the APA Ethics Code (see policy statement #1). The program also reminds all students in the program that professors who are currently teaching or supervising Counseling Psychology students are constrained in their behavior as per the Auburn University Policy as well as the APA Ethical Standards. Faculty members who violate this policy are subject to disciplinary action by the university.

Auburn University Policy: “Auburn University prohibits all faculty, administrators and supervisors, including graduate teaching assistants, from pursuing or engaging in romantic or sexual relationships with students, both graduate and undergraduate, whom they are currently supervising or teaching. Violations should be promptly reported to the University’s Affirmative Action Office. Violations of this policy will be addressed through appropriate disciplinary action.”

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Policy Statement #21: Problems with Competency (Previously “Impairment”)

Although the Counseling Psychology Faculty has responsibility to evaluate students, students themselves are strongly encouraged to self-monitor and to seek help early for any personal, professional, or ethical problems they notice in themselves (also see Policy #1–Ethics & Respect and Policy #7–Respect for Diversity). Furthermore, students are encouraged to assist fellow students who appear to be significantly affected by personal or professional problems. Such assistance may take the form of speaking directly with the fellow student or consulting with a member of the faculty. Students may consult the Director of the Program or other faculty members for a referral when students desire psychotherapy.

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Policy Statement #22: Grades of “C” or Lower (This policy is effective Fall, 2010)

[NOTE: Courses for which a grade of “D” or “F” were earned MUST be repeated. This is a requirement of the Graduate School of Auburn University. In addition, students earning grades of “D” or “F” in more than two courses will be recommended for dismissal from the program regardless of retakes of previous courses where such grades were earned. Grades of “Unsatisfactory” are considered grades of “F.”]

Students must understand that although grades of “C” are accepted for credit with the constraints below, there may be state licensure boards which do not accept such grades. Should a student apply for licensure in such a state, licensure may be jeopardized with consequences ranging from the need to repeat courses to the outright denial of licensure. However, to our knowledge, no graduate of our program has ever been denied licensure based on course grades or an inadequate curriculum, nor to our knowledge has any graduate had to repeat courses or take new courses when applying for licensure as a psychologist.

Although the Graduate School of Auburn University accepts grades of “C” or better for credit (with the provision that the overall GPA may not fall below 3.0), the Counseling Psychology Program places certain constraints on grades of “C.” The following rules apply to students enrolled in the Ph.D. program in Counseling Psychology:

a) A grade of “C” is not acceptable for credit in the course “Contemporary Issues in Counseling Psychology” (this course is often informally referred to as the “Ethics Course”). Furthermore, a grade of “C” is not acceptable in the course “Counseling Diverse Populations.” In addition, a grade of “C” is not acceptable in the course “Introduction to Counseling Practice” or in the courser “Group Counseling.” Any student earning a grade of “C” in either of the above courses will be required to retake the course in which the “C” was earned.

b) Considering all courses in which the student enrolls at Auburn University, a grade of “C” may be earned in a maximum of two courses without re-takes. If a third (or fourth) C is earned, the COP faculty will make the decision as to which of the courses must be re- taken. For example, if a student earns a “C” in Intellectual Assessment, Advanced Theories, and Lifespan Development, the COP faculty will decide which of these three courses must be re-taken.

c) Students will be given a maximum of two retakes to earn a grade of B or better for any given course. Students who do not meet this criterion will be dismissed from the program.

d) For students who receive a grade of “C” or lower in more than four courses, the COP faculty will recommend to the doctoral committee that such students be dismissed from the program. This policy applies regardless of grades earned in retakes and regardless of overall GPA.

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Policy #23: Practicum Evaluation

(This policy describes a practicum evaluation form, with accompanying rules, which became effective Spring semester, 2017 and replaces a policy that became effective in Fall semester, 2010)

The following scale will be used for on-site supervisors to evaluate students on each of the dimensions listed on the program practicum evaluation form:
1 = Unacceptable
2 = Substantially Below Beginning Practicum Student Skill Level
3 = Below Beginning Practicum Student Skill Level
4 = Consistent with Beginning Practicum Student Skill Level
5 = Consistent with Some Prior Clinical Experience
6 = Consistent with Advanced Practicum
7 = Above Skill Level of Advanced Practicum Student
8 = Substantially Exceeds Skill Level of Advanced Practicum Student

A. For Students in COUN 7910
To receive a grade of “satisfactory” in practicum, the student must receive ratings from the on-site supervisor which have the following characteristics:

1) No dimension may be rated “unacceptable”

2) No more than two of the rated dimensions can be rated “substantially below beginning practicum student skill level” starting in spring term of 2017

3) At least half rated dimensions must be rated “consistent with beginning practicum student skill level” or better

4) The student cannot be rated as having violated ethical principles for psychologists

In addition, a grade of “satisfactory” in practicum requires that the on-site supervisor who completes the form be a licensed psychologist in the jurisdiction where the student engaged in the clinical work and that the on-site supervisor who completes the form indicate that their evaluation is based at least in part on video-taped or live observation of the student’s work. Audio-taped observation will not be sufficient. If the on-site supervisor does not verify that they are a licensed psychologist and that their supervision of the student involved video-taped or live observation, the practicum instructor can substitute their own observation provided that they were able to observe the student’s work through video-tape review or live observation.

B. For Students in COUN 8910
To receive a grade of “satisfactory” in practicum, the student must receive ratings from the on-site supervisor which have the following characteristics:

1) No rating of “unacceptable”

2) No more than one rated dimension may be rated “below beginning practicum student skill level” starting in spring term of 2017

3) At least half of the rated dimensions must be rated “consistent with some prior clinical experience” or better

4) The student cannot be rated as having violated ethical principles for psychologists
In addition, a grade of “satisfactory” in practicum requires that the on-site supervisor who completes the form be a licensed psychologist in the jurisdiction where the student engaged in the clinical work and that the on-site supervisor who completes the form indicate that their evaluation is based at least in part on video-taped or live observation of the student’s work. Audio-taped observation will not be sufficient. If the on-site supervisor does not verify that they are a licensed psychologist and that their supervision of the student involved video-taped or live observation, the practicum instructor can substitute their own observation provided that they were able to observe the student’s work through video-tape review or live observation.

C. Starting in Fall, 2017, students will be required to register for “Externship” in terms when they are completing a Program Approved Clinical Experience (initially taught as COUN 8970). Because students from a range of training levels enroll in externship, a grade of “satisfactory” in externship requires that:

• Students must submit documentation of the hours earned while completing clinical work

• Students must submit an evaluation of their program approved clinical experience from a supervisor

• In general, the evaluation must be from a licensed psychologist who observed the student’s work

• The student cannot be rated as having violated ethical principles for psychologists

D. The above are typically considered necessary, but not sufficient conditions to receive a grade of “satisfactory” in practicum. Although the instructor will carefully consider the on-site supervisor’s feedback, because the instructor bears final responsibility for assigning the grade, and because a variety of factors (including but not limited to, class attendance, class performance, responses to instructions from the instructor, and overall competence of the on-site supervisor) must be considered in assigning the final grade, exceptions to the above can be made by the instructor.

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Policy Statement #24: Grievance Procedures for Faculty

The Program endorses university policies related to due process and grievance procedures for faculty. Relevant policies include various ones published by the office of AA/EEO (see policies). This website includes policies regarding prohibited harassment of employees, Accommodations for Employees under the American with Disabilities Act (ADA), and a Discrimination Complaint Form which may be used by faculty members who wish to file a complaint with the office of AA/EEO. Additional related material may be found in the Faculty Handbook.

Article 6 of the University Senate Constitution outlines a procedure which can be used by any faculty member who has a grievance. Faculty members who have any job-related concern may also use the services of the university Ombudsperson.

Any member of the Counseling Psychology Faculty who has a concern about the way the counseling psychology program is administered, or who has specific concerns about any action anticipated or taken by the program, is encouraged to talk first with the Director of the Program. If this informal approach proves unsuccessful, faculty members may express concerns to the Department Head, or, if applicable, pursue one or more of the options noted above. All faculty members, including the Program Director, are encouraged to be especially responsive to concerns which bear directly on student welfare.

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Policy Statement #25: Minimal Levels of Acceptable Achievement

This policy brings together in one place a summary of the minimum levels of acceptable achievement for Counseling Psychology Students.

1. The Graduate School requires that you maintain a 3.0 GPA throughout your time in graduate school. Failure to maintain this GPA will result in action by the Graduate School including probation followed by suspension, followed by termination if the GPA is not raised sufficiently. See “Academic Standing” in the Graduate School section of the University Bulletin.

2. Certain constraints apply when you make a grade of “C” in one or more courses. See Policy #22—Grades of “C.” Furthermore, any Auburn course in which you make a “D” or “F” must be repeated. In addition, students who repeat a course and receive a grade lower than “C” for a second time will be recommended for dismissal from the program. Note that the rule regarding repeating courses with grades of “D” or “F” is a rule of The Graduate School.

3. During practicum, your on-site supervisor must evaluate you along a number of dimensions and the ratings along these dimensions must not fall below certain levels (note, that when the on-site supervisor doesn’t meet the qualifications set forth by the program, a licensed psychologist will have to complete the evaluation). See Policy #23— Practicum Evaluation.

4. In order to graduate, you must satisfactorily complete your written preliminary examinations, receiving by majority vote, a passing rating on each of three written sections (Ethics and Professional Issues, Theory and Practice, and Research). See Section IV of Policy #5—Evaluation of Counseling Psychology Students.

5. In order to graduate, you must satisfactorily complete your psychotherapy project. See Section V of Policy#5—Evaluation of Counseling Psychology Students.

6. In order to graduate, you must satisfactorily complete the competency portfolio which includes certain constraints about ratings on the Professional Skills Rating Form, on-site supervisor evaluations for the term used for the intervention component of the portfolio, and certain ratings from the on-site supervisor for the group therapy component of the portfolio.

7. You must pass (by vote of the examining committee), your general doctoral oral exam. This is a requirement of the Graduate School and must be successfully completed before formal admission to doctoral candidacy. The general doctoral oral exam may not be taken until the written preliminary exam has been passed, including the psychotherapy project and competency portfolio (the competency portfolio requirement applies to students who entered the program during or after Fall, 2017). For students who enter the program during or after Fall, 2017, ratings from the committee on the Rating Form for Counseling Psychology Student Oral Exam – Dissertation Proposal form (which is used for the general oral exam because this exam is the dissertation proposal for such students, must be “2” or better for the domains of “Formulate Research 1,” “Formulate Research 2,” “Research Knowledge,” and “Oral Presentation Skills” and must be at “3” or better for “Ethics.”

8. The outside reader of the Graduate School must not rate your dissertation methodology as “inaccurate.” If you receive a rating of “inaccurate,” you will be required to make changes/corrections/additions until the outside reader communicates that your methodology is no longer “inaccurate.” Your goal should be to obtain a rating of “accurate.” If you receive a rating of “questionable,” this requires further discussion with your advisor. In addition, the outside reader must rate the dissertation as “Approved with noted corrections” or “Approved, with no corrections.” Additional Requirements Apply for students who enter the program during or after Fall, 2017: (1) the outside reader of the Graduate School must rate your dissertation as “Fair” or better (though we expect ratings of “Good” and “Excellent” and ratings of “Fair” will require additional consultation with the outside reader) on “Significance of the Problem (Quality of ideas and originality)” and (2) “General Scholarship” on The Graduate School Dissertation Evaluation Form must be rated “Good” or higher, or a rating of “Fair” with the dissertation approved with noted corrections.

9. You must successfully defend your dissertation by unanimous vote of the doctoral committee and outside reader appointed by the graduate school.

10. You must successfully complete an internship which is as a minimum a member of APPIC and judged to be of equal quality training compared to APA-accredited programs. Students are expected to seek and obtain internship sites accredited by the American Psychological Association. See Policy #13-Internship.

11. You must complete your degree within four years of taking your general oral. If unable for any reason to complete the requirements on time, the student may petition the dean of the Graduate School for a maximum of a one-year extension. Students failing to complete the degree in the allotted time revert to the status of an applicant and must petition the dean of the Graduate School to retake the general oral examination. See “Time Limit” in the Graduate School section of the University Bulletin. Note that no extensions are guaranteed and no re-takes of the general oral are guaranteed. Students who exceed the “Time Limit” will be placed on remediation if they are allowed an extension or a re-take of the general oral. The doctoral examination committee will determine the nature of this remediation plan (including specific requirements) for students who entered the program prior to Fall of 2017. For students who enter the program during or after the Fall term of 2017, the re-take of the oral will require a dissertation proposal that is approved. Specifically, if a student was unable to complete the dissertation within four years after the proposal, the new proposal must be approved within six months of the expiration of the “Time Limit.” If a student receives such an extension and fails to comply with the details of the remediation plan including failure to complete the requirements within the extended time frame, the program will recommend them for dismissal.

12. You must successfully complete all the courses published as being required by the program. In order to remain in good standing and make progress toward graduation, students must take courses in the specified sequence. This policy requires that students obtain approval from their advisor and the Training Director prior to dropping any course because dropping a course results in a delay in completed courses in the specified sequence. See Policy #15—Required courses.

13. You must not violate the Ethical Standards of the American Psychological Association. See Policy #1—Ethics & Respect. You must receive IRB approval (or waiver) for any research you conduct with human subjects while you are a student in the program.

14. You must meet the competencies published by the program. See Program Description provided on the program webpage (click on the link “Program Description”) and Appendix II.

15. You must make satisfactory progress toward your degree both in terms of academic progress and in terms of personal development/professional behavior. Failure to do so will result in remediation or dismissal. See Policy #6– Due Process, Remediation, and Dismissal. Also see Policy #5, Evaluation of Counseling Psychology Students. As outlined in Policy #5, it is not possible or reasonable to have a complete list of what constitutes failure to make satisfactory progress. However, Policy #5 does give some examples of the kinds of behavior which might lead to a negative letter of evaluation and possible invoking of due process/remediation. You will receive a minimum of one letter of evaluation each year. Attention will be drawn to your strengths and weaknesses and if in the judgment of the faculty you are not making satisfactory progress, they may recommend to your committee that you be placed on remediation. Failure to successfully remediate may result in dismissal.

16. You must follow all program policies as published by the program and you must respond in an appropriate and timely manner to any reasonable requests from the faculty (e.g., completing reports about your activities, directions about contacting practicum sites, attending required meetings, etc.).

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Policy Statement #26: Domains of Knowledge Required for Written Prelims

All domains include the assumptions that one will be familiar with relevant recent empirical research and scholarly writing as well as literature and professional standards that relate to multicultural competence and practice across all three domains.

Theory & Practice
1) For each of the following theories/therapeutic approaches, be able to outline & discuss its theory of human nature/behavior, causes of psychopathology or problem behaviors, techniques of therapy, and research supporting and/or refuting its efficacy.

• Psychodynamic (including psychoanalytic; neo-analytic; interpersonal)

• Adlerian

• Person-Centered

• REBT

• Cognitive (and Cognitive-Behavioral)

• Multicultural

• Feminist

• Behavioral

2) Be familiar with the basic theoretical concepts and suggested treatments associated with each of the following vocational theories, and be familiar with the advantages and disadvantages of each in addressing the needs of culturally diverse populations.

• Holland’s theory of careers

• Super’s career development theory

• Lent, Brown, & Hackett’s social cognitive career theory

• Gottfredson’s theory of circumscription and compromise

3) Be able (in depth) to explain, discuss, apply, and defend your own theory/approach to psychotherapy

4) Be able to critique and compare theories and discuss multicultural implications.

5) Be able to describe the process of good theory building and the characteristics of a good theory of psychotherapy

6) Be able to articulate the interrelationships between assessment and therapy and apply that knowledge to a particular case study.

7) Be able to outline a treatment plan for a case study, using a particular theory.

8) Be able to discuss the literature on common factors in psychotherapy.

9) Be able to discuss empirically supported treatments for common disorders and empirically based treatment in general.

10) Be able to discuss various constructs which arise from group dynamics and group psychotherapy including norms, roles, stages, leadership, deviance, conformity, and social desirability. Be able to apply such constructs and discuss their implications when applied to a psychotherapy group.

11) Be able to discuss the practical, theoretical, and empirical issues in supervision.

12) Be able to discuss how to evaluate treatment outcomes and use those outcomes to improve your ability to make progress with clients.

Research
1) Be familiar with the basic properties, strengths, weaknesses, and appropriate uses of the various quantitative and qualitative methods of data analysis that are covered in the required research and statistics courses. These include but are not limited to ANOVA, ANCOVA, Multiple regression, correlation, and factor analysis.

2) Be able to discuss the different types of reliability and validity that are important to the research process.

3) Be able to critique a research investigation and determine its methodological strengths and weaknesses and its justifiable conclusions.

4) Be familiar with theorizing and past and recent research about process and outcome in psychotherapy, including issues and findings.

5) Be able to discuss the advantages and disadvantages associated with different research designs (e.g., cross-sectional vs. longitudinal, single-subject vs. large group).

6) Be familiar with the debate in the professional literature about the use of “significance levels” versus “effect size” in determining statistical and practical significance of quantitative results.

7) Be able to discuss, explain, and apply basic constructs in research design such as moderating, mediating, confounding, and covariate variables, randomization, hypothesis generation and testing. Be able to discuss, explain, and apply (e.g., using a particular study) various types of threats to a design and how to address such threats.

8) Be able to apply each of the above (in this section) concepts in designing a study.

Professional Issues and Ethics
1) Be familiar with the general history of counseling psychology, including contributors to the field as well as important events.

2) Be aware of various articulated perspectives on the philosophy of counseling psychology.

3) Be able to discuss the role played by various psychology organizations (e.g., APA, APS, ASPPB, ABPP, CCPTP, APPIC) in shaping the landscape of scientific and professional psychology.

4) Be aware of the purpose of, and typical requirements for, licensure as a psychologist.

5) Be able to demonstrate knowledge of, and ability to analyze, the APA Ethics Code.

6) Be able to apply the APA Code to scientific and professional practice.

7) Be able to critique the APA Code, the norms of the profession and generally accepted standards of care in light of multiple perspectives (e.g., feminist and multicultural perspectives, empirical findings, theoretical understandings of decision making, and personal values).

8) Be able to articulate and discuss constructs, with references to relevant literature, that have been closely identified with ethical and legal issues in psychology (e.g., boundaries, malpractice, standard of care, informed consent).

9) Be able to discuss current issues in counseling psychology (e.g., managed care, prescription privileges) and be able to have an awareness of the various approaches to training in psychology (e.g., scientist/practitioner, reflective educator, PsyD, etc.).

10) Be able to describe and apply the various guidelines published by the American Psychological association which focus on diverse and specific populations (e.g., Multicultural Guidelines, Guidelines for Practice with Girls and Women, etc.).

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Policy Statement #27: Student Support Services

Faculty recognize that students may need support services when enrolled in the doctoral program. A number of resources have been detailed in several of the policies above. Other resources available on campus include Student Counseling Services, Safe Harbor (violence against women program), Student Financial Aid, Program of Accessibility, Office of Multicultural Affairs, Career Development Services, University Medical Center, Pharmacy Clinic, Health and Wellness, and Student Recreation/Activity Center. Members of the faculty affirm their support for students who seek psychotherapy. In particular, we call attention to the support available at the Student Counseling Services. Although our students do a practicum there, we emphasize that all students are eligible to receive services from the counseling center. If you have questions or concerns about how receiving services might impact your practicum there, please discuss this with the Director of Counseling Psychology Training, or feel free to contact the

Director of the Counseling Center. In the past, the student insurance has at times covered the costs of outside counseling with a letter from the Director of the Counseling Center. The Program Director (in addition to other faculty members) is also available to discuss resource options in the community.

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Policy Statement #28: University Policies and Rules

It is the responsibility of all counseling psychology graduate students to be familiar with and to abide by the policies and rules of Auburn University. These policies and rules may be found in various publications and announcements by the University; however, in particular students must be familiar with the policies of the Graduate School which can be found under “Final Examination.” Policies may also be included in larger university documents such as the Auburn Bulletin. Students must also be familiar with the Student Policy eHandbook, which is the Official Auburn University Student Handbook.

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Policy Statement #29: Admissions Requirements of Degree Completion

(Effective for students entering in Fall of 2015 and later.) All U.S. students must have completed a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution (international applicants must meet graduate school policies which outline equivalent requirements for the admission of international students) prior to enrollment in the program. Any student who is unable to provide a transcript documenting conferral of the bachelor’s degree by the first day of classes during the term for which they were admitted will be automatically dismissed from the program.

At time of application, students must indicate whether they wish to be considered as a post-bachelor’s applicant or a post-master’s applicant. Although all students will be admitted to the same doctoral program, it is expected that students who apply as post-master’s candidates do so because they intend and agree to complete their master’s degree prior to admission to the program. Students who intend to complete a master’s degree in any field and would like the admissions committee to consider their master’s degree as evidence of their ability to complete graduate coursework should apply as a post-master’s applicant. As noted in information elsewhere on the website, earning a master’s degree in a relevant field can strengthen an application (though we admit students without any master’s coursework as well). In particular, completion of a master’s degree is viewed as data supporting the applicant’s ability to complete graduate level coursework and work toward degree completion (scores on GRE and undergraduate academic coursework are also considered for all applicants in evaluating the ability of the applicant to complete graduate level coursework). Individuals who do not intend to complete a master’s degree prior to the start of the program must apply as a post-bachelor’s applicant and the committee will not include expectation of completion of the master’s degree in evaluating the quality of the application. Individuals who apply as a post- master’s applicant must provide evidence of completion of the master’s degree (typically in the form of a transcript documenting conferral of degree) by the first day of classes during the fall term in which they were admitted for enrollment. We do not offer an option to defer enrollment. If an individual applied as a post-master’s applicant and has not provided evidence of degree completion by the start of the fall term, the new student will be placed on probation/remediation and notified that they must provide evidence of degree completion within the first semester or they will be dismissed from the program. Any individual who has not provided such evidence by the end of that fall term (defined as the last day of regularly- scheduled classes of the term) will be dismissed from the program.

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Policy Statement #30: Assistantships

The Counseling Psychology program faculty collaborate with other departmental faculty and units on campus to place students in assistantships. In general, there is a departmental person who serves as the point of contact for assistantships coordinated through the department. If students are uncertain about who that individual is, they should ask the Director of Training. The Director of Training will also serve as a point of contact regarding assistantships.

The program prioritizes placement of incoming (1st year) students in assistantships, followed by 2nd year, then 3rd year, and then 4th year students. The program will rarely place a student in their 5th year in an assistantship (though the student may apply for assistantships that are not affiliated with the department). For students who enter the program during or after the Fall term of 2017, students in any assistantship within the department (indicated by * below) will not be able to retain the assistantship past their fifth year. This does not prohibit the student from identifying an assistantship separate from those coordinated by the department on their own. Below is a list of assistantships that may have some departmental affiliation (the exact degree of affiliation varies but for each of the units below the student should contact the Director of Training and not the assistantship site if there is an interest in an assistantship at the site).

Departmentally Coordinated Assistantships

• SERC Department Research Assistantships*

• SERC Department Teaching Assistantships*

• SERC Department Graduate Assistantships*

• Athletic Department Teaching Assistantships*

• Athletic Department Graduate Assistantships*

• LCYDC Contract Assistantships*

• Psychology Department/Mt. Meigs Assistantships

• Student Health and Wellness Assistantships

• Career Center Assistantships

• College of Education Dean’s Office Assistantships

• College of Liberal Arts Dean’s Office Assistantships

• College of Science and Math Assistantships

• College of Business Assistantships

• Women’s Studies Assistantship

• Academic Support Services Assistantship

• Auburn Transition Leadership Institute Assistantships*

• EFLT Departmental Assistantships

Note, * indicates an assistantship that cannot be held by any student beyond their 5th year in the program who entered during or after the Fall term of 2017.

Students should not directly contact the above assistantships to arrange interviews or application. Often, when students do this, the above listed sites recognize that the student has violated agreed upon policies and decide not to consider the student for an assistantship. At times, the Director of Training will receive notice about assistantship opportunities not coordinated through the department and send those out to all students. Examples of such assistantships include working for Housing, the Writing Center, the Library, and the graduate assistant fair.

Once a student is placed at a site it is expected that the student will strive to perform well and will fulfill the duties of the assistantship (note that starting in January of 2016 all assistantships have job descriptions). Because sites often wish to keep their graduate assistants for multiple years, the program does not require individuals to vacate positions they have held (so it may be possible that a more advanced student keeps an assistantship that they have already held even though they are not a priority in funding). When students decide to vacate an assistantship and want to apply through the department process, the priority in placing the student will generally reflect the priority listed above (first year students have the highest priority and students who have been in the program have the lowest priority). Exceptions to the priority policies include when an assistantship has specific qualifications only found among advanced students (e.g., assistantships where students provide clinical services, assistantships where students must have completed courses to qualify) and a student who has not previously been funded through a departmentally-coordinated assistantship who in later years wants to be funded through a departmentally coordinated assistantship would be the top priority from their cohort.

When students are considering assistantship options, students should be aware that departmentally-based assistantships are not carried forward from year-to-year. The departmentally-based (those that are attached to research or teaching in SERC) are generally given to students in their 1st year and any student who has previously held a departmental research or teaching position should assume that they will need to identify and apply for other assistantship options. The faculty recognize that students often have specific professional interests that make a particular assistantship more desirable than others. We certainly encourage students to pursue those assistantship opportunities, but we also encourage students who need the financial benefits provided by an assistantship to be open to applying to all assistantship opportunities for which they are qualified as limited numbers of positions may mean the desired assistantship is not an option in any particularly year.

Any student dismissed from an assistantship for failure to perform or whose assistantship is not renewed due to poor work performance will be evaluated by the faculty to determine whether subsequent efforts to place the student in an assistantship are appropriate. In general, any student who performed poorly in an assistantship in the past will not be provided with opportunities to apply for departmentally coordinated assistantships.

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Policy Statement #31: Social Media and Public Representations

Students in this program represent Auburn University; the College of Education; the Department of Special Education, Rehabilitation and Counseling; the counseling psychology (COP) doctoral program; and the profession of counseling psychology. As such, students are expected to maintain professional standards of behavior in public settings, in conjunction with Policies #1, 7, and 8. Students must consider that all personal representations made on social media and other online platforms are inherently public behavior and thus also fall under the purview of this policy. Students who engage in behavior that violates a client’s confidentiality or creates the appearance of lack of privacy by discussing client-related issues in public (including social media) will be considered to have violated this policy. Social media and other public forums are not places to discuss how you feel about a client, your students, or your work with clients or students.

In addition, students who engage in public behaviors (including on social media) that create a hostile environment for peers will be considered to have violated this policy. Examples of behaviors that can create a hostile environment include, but are not limited to: using derogatory terms, insults, telling derogatory jokes, taunting, and intimidation. Faculty will consider the context, nature, scope, frequency, duration, and severity of incidents to determine whether a student has created a hostile environment. Students or prospective students found to have created a hostile environment will be subject to policies related to remediation and dismissal. This policy reflects the need and desire to protect the rights and wellbeing of others, as well as the professional standing of the program, college, university, and field of counseling psychology.

In general, students are encouraged to maintain strict privacy settings on any personal social media accounts. Students are also expected to conform with APA ethical standards regarding multiple relationships by not seeking out our accepting social media relationships (e.g., as ‘friends’ on Facebook) with current students for whom the COP student is an instructor of record or with current or former clients. This policy does not prevent COP students from allowing their students to ‘follow’ them on academic sites like LinkedIn or ResearchGate.

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Appendix I: List of Required Courses and Learning Activities

COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY PROGRAM—AUBURN UNIVERSITY LIST OF REQUIRED COURSES AND LEARNING ACTIVITIES

The program relies on the curriculum sequence to communicate the required courses in the sequence that students are expected to complete the coursework. Here we list the required courses, the elements and competencies to which they relate, as well as other learning experiences/program requirements.

Discipline-Specific Knowledge Category 1
History and Systems of Psychology
COUN 8970 Great Ideas in Psychology (PSYC 7100 is an approved substitute, requires approval)

Basic Content Areas in Scientific Psychology
Affective Aspects of Behavior – PSYC 7190 Cognitive Psychology (or approved COUN course on Cognitive and Affective Bases of Behavior)

Biological Aspects of Behavior – PSYC 7150 Biological Bases of Behavior

Cognitive Aspects of Behavior (uses same course as Affective Aspects of Behavior – PSYC 7190 or COUN course on Cognitive and Affective Bases of Behavior)

Developmental Aspects of Behavior – COUN 7310 Counseling Across the Lifespan

Social Aspects of Behavior – PSYC 7180 Social Psychology (or approved COUN course on Social Psychology)

Discipline-Specific Knowledge Category 2
Advanced Integrative Knowledge of Basic Discipline-Specific Content Areas
COUN 8970 Psychological Science & Health

Research Methods
COUN 8300 Research Design

Quantitative Methods
Program approved first semester doctoral stats course Program approved second semester doctoral stats course

Psychometrics
ERMA 8350 Advanced Measurement Theory

Profession-Wide Competencies

Research
Although statistics is the foundation to Research Competency, it is also covered within Discipline-Specific Knowledge. As such, we have listed those courses in that area to avoid redundant listing of courses/requirements

COUN 8230 Colloquium in Counseling Psychology I (may be taught as COUN 7970)

COUN 8240 Colloquium in Counseling Psychology II (may be taught as COUN 7970)

COUN 8250 Colloquium in Counseling Psychology III (may be taught as COUN 8970)

COUN 8260 Colloquium in Counseling Psychology IV (may be taught as COUN 8970)

COUN 8400 Professional Seminar in Counseling Psychology
Preliminary Written Exams
Oral Exam (Dissertation Proposal)
Dissertation and Final Oral Exam (Dissertation Defense) – requires at least 10 hours enrollment in COUN 8990 (Research & Dissertation)

Ethical and Legal Standards
COUN 8230 Colloquium in Counseling Psychology I (may be taught as COUN 7970)

COUN 8240 Colloquium in Counseling Psychology II (may be taught as COUN 7970)

COUN 8250 Colloquium in Counseling Psychology III (may be taught as COUN 8970)

COUN 8260 Colloquium in Counseling Psychology IV (may be taught as COUN 8970)

COUN 8300 Research Design in Counseling and Evaluation

COUN 8530 Contemporary Issues in Counseling Psychology (Ethical, Legal, & Professional Issues)

Required CITI Training (until now required in Ethics course for passing grade, now required in COUN 8230 Colloquia in Counseling Psychology I)

Preliminary Written Exams

Also evaluated in practicum class and program approved clinical experiences outside of practicum as it applies to interventions

Psychotherapy Project

Oral Exam (Dissertation Proposal) – specifically see Ethics item rating

Competency Portfolio on the Professional Skills Rating Form Item 5

Individual and Cultural Diversity
COUN 7330 Diverse Populations

Written Exams (embedded into three primary sections)

Also evaluated in practicum class and program approved clinical experiences outside of practicum as it applies to interventions

Infused in courses listed across competency areas, but not listed here to avoid redundancy

COUN 8930 Internship in Counseling Psychology (successful completion is required for degree completion)

Professional Values and Attitudes
Initially explored in student selection (we continue to use the interview despite the expense because we believe this is an important part of selection of students)

COUN 8800 Professional Development & Pre-Internship Seminar

Included in required involvement in program student organization, Association of Counseling Psychology Students (ACOPS)

Integrated into annual self-evaluation and subsequent annual review of students

Infused in courses listed across competency areas, but not listed here to avoid redundancy

Evaluated in practicum class and program approved clinical experiences outside of practicum as
it applies to interventions

Psychotherapy Project (Evaluation of Strengths and Weaknesses within Session, as well as oral defense of project, specifically)

Competency Portfolio on the Professional Skills Rating Form Items 1 & 2

COUN 8930 Internship in Counseling Psychology (successful completion is required for degree completion)

Communication and Interpersonal Skills
Initially explored in student selection (we continue to use the interview despite the expense because we believe this is an important part of selection of students, and we fundamentally believe that good foundational interpersonal skills must exist because it is difficult to undo several decades of learning within 4-6 years during which a student is enrolled in a program; furthermore, we believe that good interpersonal skills are needed for beginning therapists)

COUN 7350 Introduction to Counseling Practice

Integrated into annual self-evaluation and subsequent annual review of students

Infused in courses listed across competency areas, but not listed here to avoid redundancy

Evaluated in practicum class and program approved clinical experiences outside of practicum as
it applies to interventions

Written Exams (in actual responses)

Psychotherapy Project

Oral Exam (Dissertation Proposal) – specifically see Oral Presentation Skills item rating

Dissertation and Final Exam (Dissertation Defense)

Competency Portfolio on the Professional Skills Rating Form Items 3 & 4

COUN 8930 Internship in Counseling Psychology (successful completion is required for degree completion)

Assessment
COUN 7210 Adult Appraisal

COUN 8200 Intellectual Assessment of Adults COUN 8200

COUN 8210 Test Administration and Professional Practice

Psychotherapy Project (Diagnosis and Outcomes Components Primarily)

COUN 8930 Internship in Counseling Psychology (successful completion is required for degree completion)

Intervention
COUN 7250 Advanced Assessment and Diagnosis

COUN 7320 Theories of Counseling

A COUN advanced theories course (all students must take at least one advanced theories course)

COUN 7230 Career Development and Vocational Appraisal COUN 7910 Practicum in Counseling Psychology (2 terms)

COUN 8910 Advanced Practicum in Counseling Psychology (2 terms)

Written Exams

Psychotherapy Project (Including Actual Demonstration as Well as All Written Components)

Evaluated in practicum classes listed above as well as program approved clinical experiences outside of practicum as it applies to interventions

Competency Portfolio on the Professional Skills Rating Form Item 6 (based on submitted evaluation forms from supervisors as part of the Portfolio)

COUN 8930 Internship in Counseling Psychology (successful completion is required for degree completion)

Supervision
COUN 8540 Supervision – Theory & Practice

COUN 8930 Internship in Counseling Psychology (successful completion is required for degree completion)

Consultation and Interprofessional/Interdisciplinary Skills
Exposure through contact with other professions in an interdisciplinary department

COUN 8400 Seminar in Counseling Psychology

Evaluated in practicum classes as well as program approved clinical experiences outside of practicum

COUN 8930 Internship in Counseling Psychology (successful completion is required for degree completion)

Program-Specific Competencies
Group Therapy
COUN 7340 Group Counseling

Group Therapy Evaluation Form which is a Required Part of the Competency Portfolio

Competency Portfolio on the Professional Skills Rating Form Item 7 (based on above evaluation form)

Social Justice
Integrated in courses already listed, COUN 7330 Counseling Diverse Populations, COUN 8260 Colloquium in Counseling Psychology IV, and COUN 8400 Professional Seminar in Counseling Psychology Specifically

Evaluated with the Social Justice Rubric

NOTE: Although completion of internship, required for COUN 8930, is another place where students obtain training in all Profession-Wide Competencies, the program does not specifically evaluate this competence. However, students cannot complete the program without the successful completion of internship. The program does not require that internships be accredited by the American Psychological Association, but the program does require that students complete an internship that is equivalent to those accredited by the American Psychological Association. As such, all students must complete internships that document how they meet the Standards of Accreditation for Internship. Students are required to submit written paperwork for this documentation for all Standards. To date, since the creation of this policy, no student has elected to apply to an internship site that is not accredited by the American Psychological Association.

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Appendix II: Competencies and Elements, Relevant Educational Experiences, and Student Minimum Levels of Achievement

The Profession-Wide Competencies and their elements are taken from the APA Standards of Accreditation and Implementing Regulations while Program-Specific Competencies (and elements) are set by the program

Profession-Wide Competencies
Competency: (i) Research

Elements associated with this competency:

Element 1: Demonstrate the substantially independent ability to formulate research or other scholarly activities (e.g., critical literature reviews, dissertation, efficacy studies, clinical case studies, theoretical papers, program evaluation projects, program development projects) that are of sufficient quality and rigor to have the potential to contribute to the scientific, psychological, or professional knowledge base.

Element 2: Conduct research or other scholarly activities.

Element 3: Critically evaluate and disseminate research or other scholarly activity via professional publication and presentation at the local (including the host institution), regional, or national level.

Required training/experiential activities to meet each element.

Element 1
*COUN 8240 Colloquium in Counseling Psychology II
*COUN 8260 Colloquium in Counseling Psychology IV COUN 8300 Research Design in Counseling and Evaluation COUN 8400 Professional Seminar in Counseling Psychology Written Preliminary Exam- Research section
Dissertation Proposal; For students who enter the program during or after Fall, 2017 this is the General Oral Exam

*For students who enter the program during or after Fall, 2017

Element 2
*COUN 8230 Colloquium in Counseling Psychology I
*COUN 8240 Colloquium in Counseling Psychology II
*COUN 8250 Colloquium in Counseling Psychology III
*COUN 8260 Colloquium in Counseling Psychology IV Dissertation

*For students who enter the program during or after Fall, 2017

Element 3
*COUN 8230 Colloquium in Counseling Psychology I
*COUN 8240 Colloquium in Counseling Psychology II

*COUN 8250 Colloquium in Counseling Psychology III
*COUN 8260 Colloquium in Counseling Psychology IV COUN 8300 Research Design in Counseling and Evaluation COUN 8400 Professional Seminar in Counseling Psychology
Dissertation Proposal; For students who enter the program during or after Fall, 2017 this is the General Oral Exam
Dissertation Defense

*For students who enter the program during or after Fall, 2017

How outcomes are measured for each training/experiential activity listed above.
• Grades from the following courses are used to measure competency:

o COUN 8230 Colloquium in Counseling Psychology I (grade depends also on supervisor rating of “Consistent with Beginning Doctoral Student Skill Level” across each of the rated domains for the course on the Research Competency Evaluation Form)

o COUN 8240 Colloquium in Counseling Psychology II (grade depends also on supervisor rating of “Ready for Practicum” across each domain rated for practicum readiness on the Research Competency Evaluation Form)

o COUN 8250 Colloquium in Counseling Psychology III

o COUN 8260 Colloquium in Counseling Psychology IV (grade depends also on rating of “Consistent with Some Prior Research Experience” across each of the rated domains on the Research Competency Evaluation Form)

o COUN 8300 Research Design in Counseling and Evaluation

o COUN 8400 Professional Seminar in Counseling Psychology

o Research Competency Evaluation Form (which is used as part of grading for the Colloquium courses (COUN 8230, 8240, 8250, and 8260)

• For the Dissertation:

o The Graduate School Dissertation Evaluation Form (addresses all 3 elements)

o Successful passing of proposal, which is also the Oral Exam (uses the Rating Form for Counseling Psychology Student Oral Exam – Dissertation Proposal, requires ratings of 2 or higher in all areas except Research, which requires a rating of 3 or higher) for students who enter the program during or after Fall, 2017 (assesses parts of elements 1 and 3)

o Successful passing of the dissertation defense (addresses all 3 elements)

• Obtaining a passing score on the Written Preliminary Exams Research Section

Note: for students who entered the program before Fall, 2017, students can address a failing score for one section of the Written Preliminary Exams by passing the oral exam (see Policy #5 of the Program Policies). That is, such students receive additional questions and examination for the failed area on the Oral exam. Students can only do this for one area; failing more than one area requires re-taking of Preliminary Exams for all failed areas (see Policy #5). The criteria for passing the Preliminary Written Exam using the Oral Exam is that the student must pass the Oral Exam.

o Students who enter the program during or after Fall, 2017, as well as those who opt into the new policies, must pass all sections of the Written Preliminary Exams (see Policy #5)

Minimum levels of achievement (MLAs) for each outcome measure/evaluation tool listed above.

Grades in the Colloquium courses (COUN 8230, COUN 8240, COUN 8250, and COUN 8260) must be “Satisfactory” for students who entered the program during or after Fall, 2017.

Grades in COUN 8300 and COUN 8400 must be “C” or better.

Students must receive a passing grade on the Written Preliminary Exams – Research Section (or pass the Oral Exam if the student is allowed to demonstrate competency for a failing preliminary exam grade for this section through the oral exam).

Students must be rated satisfactory on the Report on the General Doctoral Examination and the Report on the Final Examination (Defense), see Graduate School policies on the General Doctoral Examination and Final Examination.

“Methodology” on The Graduate School Dissertation Evaluation Form must not be judged by the university reader as “inaccurate.” We expect ratings of “accurate;” ratings of “questionable” require additional consultation with the outside reader. In addition, the dissertation must be rated as “Approved, with noted corrections” or “Approved, with no corrections” by the university reader.

For students who entered the program during or after Fall, 2017, the rating for “Significance of the Problem (Quality of ideas and originality)” on The Graduate School Dissertation Evaluation Form must be rated “Fair” or better though we expect ratings of “Good” and “Excellent” such that ratings of “Fair” require additional consultation with the outside reader. In addition, “General Scholarship” on The Graduate School Dissertation Evaluation Form must be rated “Good” or higher, or a rating of “Fair” with the dissertation approved with noted corrections.

For students who enter the program during or after Fall, 2017, ratings from the committee on the Rating Form for Counseling Psychology Student Oral Exam – Dissertation Proposal form must be “2” or better for the domains of “Formulate Research 1,” “Formulate Research 2,” “Research Knowledge,” and “Oral Presentation Skills” and must be at “3” or better for “Ethics.”

Competency: (ii) Ethical and legal standards

Element 1: Be knowledgeable of and act in accordance with each of the following:

o The current version of the APA Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct;

o Relevant laws, regulations, rules, and policies governing health service psychology at the organizational, local, state, regional, and federal levels; and

o Relevant professional standards and guidelines.

Element 2: Recognize ethical dilemmas as they arise, and apply ethical decision-making processes in order to resolve the dilemmas.

Element 3: Conduct self in an ethical manner in all professional activities.

Required training/experiential activities to meet each element.
Element 1
*COUN 8230 Colloquium in Counseling Psychology I

*COUN 8240 Colloquium in Counseling Psychology II

*COUN 8260 Colloquium in Counseling Psychology IV COUN

8300 Research Design in Counseling and Evaluation

COUN 8530 Contemporary Issues in Counseling Psychology

Practicum Classes (COUN 7910 Beginning Practicum and COUN 8910 Advanced Practicum)

Written Preliminary Exams – Ethics Section

Dissertation

Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative (requirement started in 2009 in the COUN 8530 Ethics and Professional Issues class

Note: although the knowledge portion of this element is addressed in many classes, we have limited the inclusion of the “training/experiential activities listed here to those that we consider most directly tied to evaluating achievement of competency related to this element.

*For students who enter the program during or after Fall, 2017

Element 2

*COUN 8240 Colloquium in Counseling Psychology II

Practicum Classes (COUN 7910 Beginning Practicum and COUN 8910 Advanced Practicum)

Written Preliminary Exams – Ethics Section

Dissertation

*For students who enter the program during or after Fall, 2017

Element 3

*COUN 8240 Colloquium in Counseling Psychology II

Practicum Classes (COUN 7910 Beginning Practicum and COUN 8910 Advanced Practicum)

Program Approved Clinical Experiences outside of practicum when students opt to engage in such training opportunities

*Competency Portfolio

Dissertation

Psychotherapy Project (requirement for students who entered the program during or after Fall, 2008)

*For students who enter the program during or after Fall, 2017

How outcomes are measured for each training/experiential activity listed above.
• Grades from the following courses are used to measure competency:

o COUN 8230 Colloquium in Counseling Psychology I (grade depends also on supervisor rating of “Consistent with Beginning Doctoral Student Skill Level” across each of the rated domains, including items 5, 6, and 8, for the course on the Research Competency Evaluation Form)

o COUN 8240 Colloquium in Counseling Psychology II (grade depends also on supervisor rating of “Ready for Practicum” across each domain, including items 5, 6, and 8, rated for practicum readiness on the Research Competency Evaluation Form)

o COUN 8260 Colloquium in Counseling Psychology IV (grade depends also on rating of “Consistent with Some Prior Research Experience” across each of the rated domains, including items 5, 6, and 8, on the Research Competency Evaluation Form)

o COUN 8300 Research Design in Counseling and Evaluation

o COUN 8530 Contemporary Issues in Counseling Psychology

o Practicum Classes (COUN 7910 Beginning Practicum and COUN 8910 Advanced Practicum)–Syllabi for Practicum require students not be rated as having violated ethical principles of psychologists on the Practicum/Program Approved Clinical Experience (PACE) Student Evaluation Form

• For Program Approved Clinical Experiences that are elective (meaning not part of practicum courses or internship), evaluation forms from supervisors using the Practicum/Program Approved Clinical Experience (PACE) Student Evaluation Form – students cannot be rated as having violated ethical principles of psychologists

• For the Dissertation:

o Successful passing of proposal, which is also the Oral Exam (uses the Rating Form for Counseling Psychology Student Oral Exam – Dissertation Proposal, requires a rating of 3 or higher) for students who enter the program during or after Fall, 2017 (assesses parts of elements 1 and 2)

o Successful passing of the dissertation defense (addresses all Element 3)

• Obtaining a passing score on the Written Preliminary Exams Ethics Section

Note: for students who entered the program before Fall, 2017, students could address a failing score for one section of the Written Preliminary Exams by passing the oral exam (see Policy #5 of the Program Policies). That is, such students receive additional questions and examination for the failed area on the Oral exam. Students can only do this for one area; failing more than one area requires re-taking of Preliminary Exams for all failed areas (see Policy #5). The criteria for passing the Preliminary Written Exam using the Oral Exam is that the student must pass the Oral Exam.

• Students who enter the program during or after Fall, 2017, as well as those who opt into the new policies, must pass all sections of the Written Preliminary Exams (see Policy #5)

• Quizzes within the program are used as the measurement for the Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative

• Competency Portfolio is part of the process of moving towards candidacy for students who enter during or after Fall, 2017 (see Policy #5; see the Professional Skills Rating Form item #6)

• Tape from the Psychotherapy Project

Minimum levels of achievement (MLAs) for each outcome measure/evaluation tool listed above.

Grades in the Colloquium courses (COUN 8230, COUN 8240, and COUN 8260) must be “Satisfactory” for students who entered the program during or after Fall, 2017.

The grade in COUN 8300 must be “C” or better.

The grade in COUN 8530 must be “B” or better.

Grades in Practicum courses (COUN 7910 Beginning Practicum and COUN 8910 Advanced Practicum) must be “Satisfactory.”

Any rating of having “violated the ethical principles for psychologists” on the Practicum/Program Approved Clinical Experience (PACE) Student Evaluation Form in practicum courses or optional Program Approved Clinical Experiences are unacceptable. Such ratings must be remediated successfully to meet minimum expectations for achievement of competency.

Students must receive a passing grade on the Written Preliminary Exams – Ethics Section (or pass the Oral Exam if the student is allowed to demonstrate competency for a failing preliminary exam grade for this section through the oral exam). See Policy #5 in Program Policies.

Students must be rated satisfactory on the Report on the General Oral Examination and the Report on the Final Oral Examination (Defense), see Graduate School policies on the General Doctoral Examination and Final Examination.

For the Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative, the minimum level of achievement is a grade of 80% across quiz sections per university policies (see the Auburn University Office of Research Compliance webpage on required training and Appendix II.B.1.b.1.9).

For students who enter the program during or after Fall, 2017, student must be rated as competent on the Professional Skills Rating Form as part of the Competency Portfolio for all items including item 6. Rating of competence on the Professional Skills Rating Form for item 6 requires “the student receive ratings of skills being “consistent with some prior clinical experience” from all supervisors for all areas rated during the most recent term at the time faculty are asked to complete this form.” In other words, faculty review all Practicum/Program Approved Clinical Experience (PACE) Student Evaluation Forms from the prior semester to ensure the criteria is met.

The faculty must judge that the tape from the Psychotherapy Project does not reveal or demonstrate a violation of ethical standards. This is integrated into the rating the faculty assign to the Tape on the Psychotherapy Project Evaluation Form. If the faculty do judge that the tape from the Psychotherapy Project reveals or demonstrates a violation of ethical standards, the faculty will specify corrective action (Pass with Conditions or Fail are used to indicate the need for corrective action) that must be demonstrated before the student has reached the minimum level of achievement for the competency. The student must ultimately receive a rating of Pass or High Pass (ratings of Pass with Conditions require additional action prior to passing the project overall).

Competency: (iii) Individual and cultural diversity

Element 1: An understanding of how their own personal/cultural history, attitudes, and biases may affect how they understand and interact with people different from themselves.

Element 2: Knowledge of the current theoretical and empirical knowledge base as it relates to addressing diversity in all professional activities including research, training, supervision/consultation, and service.

Element 3: The ability to integrate awareness and knowledge of individual and cultural differences in the conduct of professional roles (e.g., research, services, and other professional activities). This includes the ability apply a framework for working effectively with areas of individual and cultural diversity not previously encountered over the course of their careers. Also included is the ability to work effectively with individuals whose group membership, demographic characteristics, or worldviews create conflict with their own.

Element 4: Demonstrate the requisite knowledge base, ability to articulate an approach to working effectively with diverse individuals and groups, and apply this approach effectively in their professional work.

Required training/experiential activities to meet each element.
Element 1
Practicum courses (COUN 7910 Beginning Practicum and COUN 8910 Advanced Practicum)
COUN 7330 Counseling Diverse Populations

Element 2
COUN 7330 Counseling Diverse Populations COUN 7350 Introduction to Counseling Practice
COUN 8300 Research Design in Counseling and Evaluation COUN 8540 Counseling Supervision – Theory and Practice Written Preliminary Exams (integrated into all three core areas)

Element 3
Practicum courses (COUN 7910 Beginning Practicum and COUN 8910 Advanced Practicum)

Psychotherapy Project

*COUN 8230 Colloquium in Counseling Psychology I

*COUN 8240 Colloquium in Counseling Psychology II

*COUN 8260 Colloquium in Counseling Psychology IV

*For students who enter the program during or after Fall, 2017

Element 4
Practicum courses (COUN 7910 Beginning Practicum and COUN 8910 Advanced Practicum)

Psychotherapy Project

How outcomes are measured for each training/experiential activity listed above.
• Grades from the following courses are used to measure competency:

o COUN 7330 Counseling Diverse Populations

o COUN 7350 Introduction to Counseling Practice

o COUN 8230 Colloquium in Counseling Psychology I (grade depends also on supervisor rating of “Consistent with Beginning Doctoral Student Skill Level” across each of the rated domains, including item 11, for the course on the Research Competency Evaluation Form)

o COUN 8240 Colloquium in Counseling Psychology II (grade depends also on supervisor rating of “Ready for Practicum” across each domain, including item 11, rated for practicum readiness on the Research Competency Evaluation Form)

o COUN 8260 Colloquium in Counseling Psychology IV (grade depends also on rating of “Consistent with Some Prior Research Experience” across each of the rated domains, including item 11, on the Research Competency Evaluation Form)

o COUN 8300 Research Design in Counseling and Evaluation

o COUN 8540 Counseling Supervision – Theory and Practice

o Practicum Classes (COUN 7910 Beginning Practicum and COUN 8910 Advanced Practicum) – requires students to achieve certain ratings (see Practicum Guidelines)

• Competency Portfolio is part of the process of moving towards candidacy for students who enter during or after Fall, 2017 (see Policy #5; see the Professional Skills Rating Form)

• Obtaining a passing score on all sections of the Written Preliminary Exams

Note: For students who entered the program before Fall, 2017, students could address a failing score for one section of the Written Preliminary Exams by passing the oral exam (see Policy #5 of the Program Policies). That is, such students receive additional questions and examination for the failed area on the Oral exam. Students can only do this for one area; failing more than one area requires re-taking of Preliminary Exams for all failed areas (see Policy #5). The criteria for passing the Preliminary Written Exam using the Oral Exam is that the student must pass the Oral Exam.

• Psychotherapy Project Rating Form and faculty decision regarding adequacy of the Tape

Minimum levels of achievement (MLAs) for each outcome measure/evaluation tool listed above.

The grade in COUN 7330 must be “B” or better.

The grade in COUN 7350 must be “Satisfactory” for students who completed the class prior to Spring, 2015, and must be a grade of “B” or better for students who completed the class during or after Spring, 2015).

Grades in the Colloquium courses (COUN 8230, COUN 8240, and COUN 8260) must be “Satisfactory” for students who entered the program during or after Fall, 2017.

The grade in COUN 8300 must be “C” or better.

The grade in COUN 8540 must be “C” or better.

Grades in Practicum courses (COUN 7910 Beginning Practicum and COUN 8910 Advanced Practicum) must be “Satisfactory” (because all grades of “Unsatisfactory” are considered equivalent to grades of “F” and therefore unacceptable, see Policy #22 of the Program Policies). For years prior to 2017, this required that the student not receive any rating below “Barely Adequate” on the item “Ability to Work with Diverse Clients” for those completing courses prior to 2010. Between 2010 and 2016, the policies require that students in COUN 7910 not receive a rating of ”unacceptable” on the item and no more than three dimensions can be rated “substantially below expectations.” Also, between 2010 and 2016, the policies require that students in COUN 8910 not be rated as “unacceptable” in any area included on the relevant item and they may receive no more than one rating of “substantially below expectations.” Starting Spring, 2017, we use a new form that provides better anchors. Now, policies require (as articulated in Program Policies) and Practicum Guidelines (see section VII. Student Evaluation), that students in COUN 7910 not be rated as “unacceptable” in any area and that no more than two of the rated dimensions can be rated “substantially below beginning practicum student skill level.” In addition, students in COUN 7910 must be rated as “consistent with beginning practicum student skill level” or better in at least half of the rated dimensions. Similarly, students in 8910 must not receive any rating of “unacceptable” and no more than one rated dimension can be rated “below beginning practicum student skill level.” In addition, at least half of the rated dimensions must be rated “consistent with some prior clinical experience” or better.

Students must receive a passing grade on each section of the Written Preliminary Exams (or pass the Oral Exam if the student is allowed to demonstrate competency for a failing preliminary exam grade for one section through the oral exam). See Policy #5 in Program Policies.

For students who enter the program during or after Fall, 2017, student must be rated as competent on the Professional Skills Rating Form as part of the Competency Portfolio for all items including item 6. Rating of competence on the Professional Skills Rating Form for item #6 requires “the student receive ratings of skills being “consistent with some prior clinical experience” from all supervisors for all areas rated (including for item #8, “Ability to Work with Diverse Clients”) during the most recent term at the time faculty are asked to complete this form.” In other words, faculty review all Practicum/Program Approved Clinical Experience (PACE) Student Evaluation Forms from the prior semester to ensure the criteria is met. This will be used, for students who enter the program during or after Fall, 2017, as a requirement for students to be eligible to take the Oral Exam. Passing the Oral Exam is a requirement to apply for internship; therefore, this requirement helps establish readiness for internship.

The faculty must judge that the tape from the Psychotherapy Project includes an acceptable demonstration of working effectively with the client including in ways that are appropriate for the client’s unique cultural background. This is integrated into the rating the faculty assign to the Tape on the Psychotherapy Project Evaluation Form. If the faculty do judge that the tape from the Psychotherapy Project reveals or demonstrates a failure to work effectively, in a culturally competent way, with the client, the faculty will specify corrective action (Pass with Conditions or Fail are used to indicate the need for corrective action) that must be demonstrated before the student has reached the minimum level of achievement for the competency. The student must also receive a rating of Pass with Conditions, Pass, or High Pass on the overall project in order to continue with the program. Students may not take the Oral Exam until they pass the psychotherapy project (which requires ultimately earning ratings of Pass or High Pass in all areas and on the project overall).

Competency: (iv) Professional values, attitudes, and behaviors

Element 1: Behave in ways that reflect the values and attitudes of psychology, including integrity, deportment, professional identity, accountability, lifelong learning, and concern for the welfare of others

Element 2: Engage in self-reflection regarding one’s personal and professional functioning; engage in activities to maintain and improve performance, well-being, and professional effectiveness.

Element 3: Actively seek and demonstrate openness and responsiveness to feedback and supervision.

Element 4: Respond professionally in increasingly complex situations with a greater degree of independence as they progress across levels of training.

Required training/experiential activities to meet each element.
Element 1
COUN 8530 Contemporary Issues in Counseling Psychology

COUN 8800 Professional Development and Internship Skills

*Competency Portfolio

Participation in student organization (Association of Counseling Psychology Students; ACOPS)

*For students who enter the program during or after Fall, 2017

Element 2
COUN 8800 Professional Development and Internship Skills

Annual Evaluation of Students

*Competency Portfolio Psychotherapy Project

*For students who enter the program during or after Fall, 2017

Element 3
Practicum Classes (COUN 7910 Beginning Practicum and COUN 8910 Advanced Practicum)

*Competency Portfolio

*For students who enter the program during or after Fall, 2017

Element 4
Practicum Classes (COUN 7910 Beginning Practicum and COUN 8910 Advanced Practicum)

COUN 8800 Professional Development and Internship Skills

*Competency Portfolio

*For students who enter the program during or after Fall, 2017

How outcomes are measured for each training/experiential activity listed above.
• Grades from the following courses are used to measure competency:

o COUN 8530 Contemporary Issues in Counseling Psychology

o COUN 8800 Professional Development and Internship Skills

o Practicum Classes (COUN 7910 Beginning Practicum and COUN 8910 Advanced Practicum) – requires certain ratings on the Practicum/Program Approved Clinical Experience (PACE) Student Evaluation Form

• Faculty ratings during annual evaluation of students on departmental PhD Student Evaluation form (formally went into use in 2015 to meet Graduate School requirements)

• Attendance at meetings of ACOPS with expectation that students attend over half in a given year when they are on campus

• Competency Portfolio is part of the process of moving towards candidacy for students who enter during or after Fall, 2017 (see Policy #5) and the ratings are based on the activity of the self-evaluation summary of Professional Skills

• Psychotherapy Project Rating Form

Minimum levels of achievement (MLAs) for each outcome measure/evaluation tool listed above.

The grade in COUN 8530 must be “B” or better.

The grade in COUN 8800 must be “C” or better

Grades in Practicum courses (COUN 7910 Beginning Practicum and COUN 8910 Advanced Practicum) must be “Satisfactory” (because all grades of “Unsatisfactory” are considered equivalent to grades of “F” and therefore unacceptable, see Policy #22 of the Program Policies). For years prior to 2017, this required that on the Practicum Evaluation Form, the student not receive any rating below “Barely Adequate” on the item “Ability to non- defensively receive supervision” (Element 3) and “Professional judgement” (Element 4) for those completing courses prior to 2010. Between 2010 and 2016, the policies require that students in COUN 7910 not receive a rating of ”unacceptable” on the item and no more than three dimensions can be rated “substantially below expectations.” Also, between 2010 and 2016, the policies require that students in COUN 8910 not be rated as “unacceptable” in any area included on the relevant items and they may receive no more than one rating of “substantially below expectations.” Starting Spring, 2017, we use a new form that provides better anchors. Now, policies require, as articulated in Program Policies (Policy #23) and Practicum Guidelines (see section VII. Student Evaluation), that students in COUN 7910 not be rated as “unacceptable” in any area and that no more than two of the rated dimensions can be rated “substantially below beginning practicum student skill level.” In addition, students in COUN 7910 must be rated as “consistent with beginning practicum student skill level” or better in at least half of the rated dimensions. Similarly, students in 8910 must not receive any rating of “unacceptable” and no more than one rated dimension can be rated “below beginning practicum student skill level.” In addition, at least half of the rated dimensions must be rated “consistent with some prior clinical experience” or better. Furthermore, the same guidelines also apply to a new item “Growth in therapy skills” (Element 4).

On the departmental PhD Student Evaluation, all items can be seen as part of professional values, attitudes, and behaviors and therefore the overall rating is used. The overall rating must be Satisfactory (“S”) or the student will be required to complete corrective action (typically, this would mean that the student would be placed on remediation until the action is corrected and the demonstrate professional values, attitudes, and behaviors.

Attendance at greater than 50% of the meetings for ACOPS in a given year is a requirement. When students who are required to attend the organization meetings fail to do so, they are asked to take corrective action for the following year to meet this competency.

For students who enter the program during or after Fall, 2017, student must be rated as competent on the Professional Skills Rating Form as part of the Competency Portfolio for all items including items 1 (Element 1), 2 (Element 2), and 6 (Elements 3 and 4). Item #1 requires rating the student regarding his/her/zer competence to “Behave in ways that reflect the values and attitudes of psychology, including integrity, deportment, professional identity, accountability, lifelong learning, and concern for the welfare of others.” Item #2 requires rating the student regarding his/her/zer competence to “Engage in self-reflection regarding one’s personal and professional functioning; engage in activities to maintain and improve performance, well-being, and professional effectiveness.” Rating of competence on the Professional Skills Rating Form for items 1 and 2 are faculty evaluations of students (taking into account the student’s self-evaluation on the Student Professional Skills Summary Form). Rating of competence on the Professional Skills Rating Form for item #6 requires “the student receive ratings of skills being “consistent with some prior clinical experience” from all supervisors for all areas rated (including for items #19, “Ability to non-defensively receive supervision,” #15 “Professional judgement,” and #20 “Growth in therapy skills”) during the most recent term at the time faculty are asked to complete this form.” As previously noted, “Ability to non- defensively receive supervision” is means of assessing for competence for Element 3 and both “Professional judgement” and “Growth in therapy skills” are means of assessing for competence for Element 4. In other words, faculty review all Practicum/Program Approved Clinical Experience (PACE) Student Evaluation Forms from the prior semester to ensure the criteria is met. This will be used, for students who enter the program during or after Fall, 2017, as a requirement for students to be eligible to take the Oral Exam. Passing the Oral Exam is a requirement to apply for internship; therefore, this requirement helps establish readiness for internship.

The faculty must judge that the tape from the Psychotherapy Project includes an acceptable demonstration of self-reflection regarding ones strengths and weaknesses on the written portion of the project. If the faculty judge that the student did not sufficiently demonstrate awareness of his/her/zer strengths and weaknesses, the faculty will specify corrective action (Pass with Conditions or Fail are used to indicate the need for corrective action) that must be demonstrated before the student has reached the minimum level of achievement for the competency. The student must also receive a rating of Pass with Conditions, Pass, or High Pass on the overall project in order to continue with the program. Students may not take the Oral Exam until they pass the psychotherapy project (which requires ultimately earning ratings of Pass or High Pass in all areas and on the project overall).

Competency: (v) Communications and interpersonal skills

Element 1: Develop and maintain effective relationships with a wide range of individuals, including colleagues, communities, organizations, supervisors, supervisees, and those receiving professional services.

Element 2: Produce and comprehend oral, nonverbal, and written communications that are informative and well-integrated; demonstrate a thorough grasp of professional language and concepts.

Element 3: Demonstrate effective interpersonal skills and the ability to manage difficult communication well.

Required training/experiential activities to meet each element.
Element 1
COUN 7350 Introduction to Counseling Practice

COUN 8540 Counseling Supervision – Theory and Practice

Practicum Classes (COUN 7910 Beginning Practicum and COUN 8910 Advanced Practicum)

*Competency Portfolio

*For students who enter the program during or after Fall, 2017

Element 2
COUN 7350 Introduction to Counseling Practice

Psychotherapy Project

Dissertation

*Oral Exam – Dissertation Proposal

*For students who enter the program during or after Fall, 2017

Element 3
COUN 7350 Introduction to Counseling Practice

*Competency Portfolio

*For students who enter the program during or after Fall, 2017

How outcomes are measured for each training/experiential activity listed above.
• Grades from the following courses are used to measure competency:

o COUN 7350 Introduction to Counseling Practice

o COUN 8540 Counseling Supervision – Theory and Practice

o Practicum Classes (COUN 7910 Beginning Practicum and COUN 8910 Advanced Practicum) which requires certain ratings on the Practicum/Program Approved Clinical Experience (PACE) Student Evaluation Form

• Competency Portfolio is part of the process of moving towards candidacy for students who enter during or after Fall, 2017 (see Policy #5) and the ratings are based on the activity of the self-evaluation summary of Professional Skills

• For the Dissertation: Successful passing of the dissertation defense (addresses all 3 elements)

• Successful passing of proposal, which is also the Oral Exam (uses the Rating Form for Counseling Psychology Student Oral Exam – Dissertation Proposal, requires ratings of 2 or higher in all areas except Research, which requires a rating of 3 or higher) for students who enter the program during or after Fall, 2017 (assesses parts of elements 1 and 3)

• Psychotherapy Project Rating Form (overall rating, which includes all written and oral communication addresses Element 2)

Minimum levels of achievement (MLAs) for each outcome measure/evaluation tool listed above.

The grade in COUN 7350 must be “Satisfactory” for students who completed the class prior to Spring, 2015, and must be a grade of “B” or better for students who completed the class during or after Spring, 2015.

The grade in COUN 8540 must be “C” or better.

For years prior to 2017, this required that the student not receive any rating below “Barely Adequate” on the item “Ability to form good relationships with clients” for those completing courses prior to 2010. Between 2010 and 2016, the policies require that students in COUN 7910 not receive a rating of ”unacceptable” on the item and no more than three dimensions can be rated “substantially below expectations.” Also, between 2010 and 2016, the policies require that students in COUN 8910 not be rated as “unacceptable” in any area included on the relevant item and they may receive no more than one rating of “substantially below expectations.” Starting Spring, 2017, we use a new form that provides better anchors.
Now, policies require, as articulated in Program Policies (see Policy #23) and Practicum Guidelines (see section VII. Student Evaluation), that students in COUN 7910 not be rated as “unacceptable” in any area and that no more than two of the rated dimensions can be rated “substantially below beginning practicum student skill level.” In addition, students in COUN 7910 must be rated as “consistent with beginning practicum student skill level” or better in at least half of the rated dimensions. Similarly, students in 8910 must not receive any rating of “unacceptable” and no more than one rated dimension can be rated “below beginning practicum student skill level.”

For students who enter the program during or after Fall, 2017, student must be rated as competent on the Professional Skills Rating Form as part of the Competency Portfolio for all items including items 3 (Element 1), 4 (Element 3), and 6 (Elements 1). Item #3 requires rating the student regarding his/her/zer competence to “Develop and maintain effective relationships with a wide range of individuals, including colleagues, communities, organizations, supervisors, and those receiving professional services.” Item #4 requires rating the student regarding his/her/zer competence to “Demonstrate effective interpersonal skills and the ability to manage difficult communications well.” Rating of competence on the Professional Skills Rating Form for items 3 and 4 are faculty evaluations of students (taking into account the student’s self-evaluation on the Student Professional Skills Summary Form). Rating of competence on the Professional Skills Rating Form for item #6 requires “the student receive ratings of skills being “consistent with some prior clinical experience” from all supervisors for all areas rated (including for item #7, “Ability to form good relationships with clients”) during the most recent term at the time faculty are asked to complete this form.” In other words, faculty review all Practicum/Program Approved Clinical Experience (PACE) Student Evaluation Forms from the prior semester to ensure the criteria is met. This will be used, for students who enter the program during or after Fall, 2017, as a requirement for students to be eligible to take the Oral Exam. Passing the Oral Exam is a requirement to apply for internship; therefore, this requirement helps establish readiness for internship.

Students must be rated satisfactory on the Report on the General Oral Examination and the Report on the Final Oral Examination (Defense), see Graduate School policies and the AU Bulletin (Final Examination), respectively).

For students who enter the program during or after Fall, 2017, ratings from the committee on the Rating Form for Counseling Psychology Student Oral Exam – Dissertation Proposal form must be “2” or better for the domains of “Oral Presentation Skills” must be “2” or better.

The faculty must judge that the tape, write up, and oral discussion/presentation from the Psychotherapy Project demonstrates effective communication (Element 2). If the faculty judge that the student did not effectively communicate, the faculty will specify corrective action (Pass with Conditions or Fail are used to indicate the need for corrective action) that must be demonstrated before the student has reached the minimum level of achievement for the competency. The student must also receive a rating of Pass with Conditions, Pass, or High Pass on the overall project in order to continue with the program. Students may not take the Oral Exam until they pass the psychotherapy project (which requires ultimately earning ratings of Pass or High Pass in all areas and on the project overall).

Competency: (vi) Assessment

Element 1: Select and apply assessment methods that draw from the best available empirical literature and that reflect the science of measurement and psychometrics; collect relevant data using multiple sources and methods appropriate to the identified goals and questions of the assessment as well as relevant diversity characteristics of the service recipient.

Element 2: Interpret assessment results, following current research and professional standards and guidelines, to inform case conceptualization, classification, and recommendations, while guarding against decision-making biases, distinguishing the aspects of assessment that are subjective from those that are objective.

Element 3: Communicate orally and in written documents the findings and implications of the assessment in an accurate and effective manner sensitive to a range of audiences.

Required training/experiential activities to meet each element.
Element 1
COUN 7210 Appraisal in Counseling and Psychology –Adult

COUN 8200 Intellectual Assessment of Adults

COUN 8210 Test Administration and Professional Practice

Psychotherapy Project (Summary of Assessment and Diagnosis)

Element 2
COUN 7210 Appraisal in Counseling and Psychology –Adult

COUN 8200 Intellectual Assessment of Adults

Practicum Classes (COUN 7910 Beginning Practicum and COUN 8910 Advanced Practicum)

Element 3
COUN 7210 Appraisal in Counseling and Psychology –Adult

COUN 8200 Intellectual Assessment of Adults

Psychotherapy Project

How outcomes are measured for each training/experiential activity listed above.
• Grades from the following courses are used to measure competency:

o COUN 7210 Appraisal in Counseling and Psychology –Adulto COUN 8200 Intellectual Assessment of Adults

o COUN 8210 Test Administration and Professional Practice

o Practicum Classes (COUN 7910 Beginning Practicum and COUN 8910 Advanced Practicum) which requires certain ratings on the Practicum/Program Approved Clinical Experience (PACE) Student Evaluation Form

o Psychotherapy Project Rating Form (ratings for Summary of Assessment and Diagnosis [Element 1] and Outcome Assessment [Element 2] as well as overall rating which reflects written and oral communication about assessment results in the written work and discussion/presentation of the project)

Minimum levels of achievement (MLAs) for each outcome measure/evaluation tool listed above.

Grades in COUN 7210, 8200, and 8210 must be “C” or better.

Grades in Practicum courses (COUN 7910 Beginning Practicum and COUN 8910 Advanced Practicum) must be “Satisfactory” (because all grades of “Unsatisfactory” are considered equivalent to grades of “F” and therefore unacceptable, see Policy #22 of the Program Policies). For years prior to 2017, this required that the student not receive any rating below “Barely Adequate” on the item “Skill in and appropriate use of assessment” for those completing courses prior to 2010. Between 2010 and 2016, the policies require that students in COUN 7910 not receive a rating of ”unacceptable” on the item and no more than three dimensions can be rated “substantially below expectations.” Also, between 2010 and 2016, the policies require that students in COUN 8910 not be rated as “unacceptable” in any area included on the relevant item and they may receive no more than one rating of “substantially below expectations.” Starting Spring, 2017, we use a new form that provides better anchors. Now, policies require, as articulated in Program Policies, (see Policy #23) and Practicum Guidelines (see section VII. Student Evaluation), that students in COUN 7910 not be rated as “unacceptable” in any area and that no more than two of the rated dimensions can be rated “substantially below beginning practicum student skill level.” In addition, students in COUN 7910 must be rated as “consistent with beginning practicum student skill level” or better in at least half of the rated dimensions. Similarly, students in 8910 must not receive any rating of “unacceptable” and no more than one rated dimension can be rated “below beginning practicum student skill level.” In addition, at least half of the rated dimensions must be rated “consistent with some prior clinical experience” or better.

The faculty must judge that the tape, write up, and oral discussion/presentation from the Psychotherapy Project demonstrates effective selection and application of assessment methods (Element 1) and communication of findings and implications (Element 3). In this case, the Summary of Assessment and Diagnosis component is the focus of the faculty when making a judgment about competency related to Element 1 and the Outcome Assessment component is the focus of the faculty when making a judgement about Element 3. If the faculty judge that the student did not effectively demonstrate competence with the effective selection and application of assessment methods as well as communication of findings and implications (Pass with Conditions or Fail are used to indicate the need for corrective action), the student must demonstrated appropriate skill in these areas before the student has reached the minimum level of achievement for the competency. The student must also receive a rating of Pass with Conditions, Pass, or High Pass on the overall project in order to continue with the program. Students may not take the Oral Exam until they pass the psychotherapy project (which requires ultimately earning ratings of Pass or High Pass in all areas and on the project overall).

Competency: (vii) Intervention

Element 1: Establish and maintain effective relationships with the recipients of psychological services.

Element 2: Develop evidence-based intervention plans specific to the service delivery goals.

Element 3: Implement interventions informed by the current scientific literature, assessment findings, diversity characteristics, and contextual variables.

Element 4: Demonstrate the ability to apply the relevant research literature to clinical decision making.

Element 5: Modify and adapt evidence-based approaches effectively when a clear evidence-base is lacking.

Element 6: Evaluate intervention effectiveness, and adapt intervention goals and methods consistent with ongoing evaluation.

Required training/experiential activities to meet each element.
Element 1
Practicum Classes (COUN 7910 Beginning Practicum and COUN 8910 Advanced Practicum)

Psychotherapy Project

*Competency Portfolio

*For students who enter the program during or after Fall, 2017

Element 2
COUN 7230 Career Development and Vocational Appraisal

COUN 7320 Counseling Theories

COUN 7350 Introduction to Counseling Practice

Element 3
COUN 7250 Advanced Assessment & Diagnosis in Counseling

Practicum Classes (COUN 7910 Beginning Practicum and COUN 8910 Advanced Practicum)

Psychotherapy Project

*Competency Portfolio

*For students who enter the program during or after Fall, 2017

Element 4
Practicum Classes (COUN 7910 Beginning Practicum and COUN 8910 Advanced Practicum)

Psychotherapy Project

Element 5
COUN 8610 or 8620 or 8630 Advanced Theories

Practicum Classes (COUN 7910 Beginning Practicum and COUN 8910 Advanced Practicum)

Psychotherapy Project

*Competency Portfolio

*For students who enter the program during or after Fall, 2017

Element 6
Practicum Classes (COUN 7910 Beginning Practicum and COUN 8910 Advanced Practicum)

Psychotherapy Project

How outcomes are measured for each training/experiential activity listed above.
• Grades from the following courses are used to measure competency:

o COUN 7230 Career Development and Vocational Appraisal

o COUN 7250 Advanced Assessment & Diagnosis in Counseling

o COUN 7320 Counseling Theories

o COUN 7350 Introduction to Counseling Practice

o COUN 8610 or 8620 or 8630 Advanced Theories

o Practicum Classes (COUN 7910 Beginning Practicum and COUN 8910 Advanced Practicum) which requires certain ratings on the Practicum/Program Approved Clinical Experience (PACE) Student Evaluation Form

• Psychotherapy Project Rating Form (Tape, Outcome Assessment, Assessment and Diagnosis Summary, Conceptualization, Scholarly Literature)
Competency Portfolio is part of the process of moving towards candidacy for students who enter during or after Fall, 2017 (see Policy #5; see the Professional Skills Rating Form items #3 and #4) and the ratings are based on the activity of the self-evaluation summary of Professional Skills

Minimum levels of achievement (MLAs) for each outcome measure/evaluation tool listed above.

The grade in COUN 7230, 7250, 7320, and 8610/8620/8630 must be “C” or better.

The grade in COUN 7350 must be “Satisfactory” for students who completed the class prior to Spring, 2015, and must be a grade of “B” or better for students who completed the class during or after Spring, 2015.

Grades in Practicum courses (COUN 7910 Beginning Practicum and COUN 8910 Advanced Practicum) must be “Satisfactory” (because all grades of “Unsatisfactory” are considered equivalent to grades of “F” and therefore unacceptable, see Policy #22 of the Program Policies). For years prior to 2017, this required that the student not receive any rating below “Barely Adequate” on any item for those students completing courses prior to 2010.
Between 2010 and 2016, the policies require that students in COUN 7910 not receive a rating of ”unacceptable” on the items and no more than three dimensions can be rated “substantially below expectations.” Also, between 2010 and 2016, the policies require that students in COUN 8910 not be rated as “unacceptable” in any area and they may receive no more than one rating of “substantially below expectations.” Starting Spring, 2017, we use a new form that provides better anchors. Now, policies require, as articulated in Policy #23 in the Program Policies) and Practicum Guidelines (see section VII. Student Evaluation), that students in COUN 7910 not be rated as “unacceptable” in any area and that no more than two of the rated dimensions can be rated “substantially below beginning practicum student skill level.” In addition, students in COUN 7910 must be rated as “consistent with beginning practicum student skill level” or better in at least half of the rated dimensions. Similarly, students in 8910 must not receive any rating of “unacceptable” and no more than one rated dimension can be rated “below beginning practicum student skill level.”

The faculty must judge that the tape, write up, and oral discussion/presentation from the Psychotherapy Project demonstrates effective use of the literature in guiding their interventions. If the faculty judge that the student did not effectively demonstrate ability to engage evidence-based intervention, the faculty will specify corrective action (Pass with Conditions or Fail are used to indicate the need for corrective action) that must be demonstrated before the student has reached the minimum level of achievement for the competency. The student must also receive a rating of Pass with Conditions, Pass, or High Pass on the overall project in order to continue with the program. Students may not take the Oral Exam until they pass the psychotherapy project, which requires ultimately earning ratings of Pass or High Pass in all areas and on the project overall. Importantly, because the Oral Exam must be completed prior to applying for internship, the successful completion of this project is directly tied to establishing readiness for internship.

For students who enter the program during or after Fall, 2017, student must be rated as competent on the Professional Skills Rating Form as part of the Competency Portfolio for all items including item 6. In other words, faculty review all Practicum/Program Approved Clinical Experience (PACE) Student Evaluation Forms from the prior semester to ensure that the criteria is met. This will be used, for students who enter the program during or after Fall, 2017, as a requirement for students to be eligible to take the Oral Exam. Passing the Oral Exam is a requirement to apply for internship; therefore, this requirement helps establish readiness for internship.

Competency: (viii) Supervision

Element 1: Demonstrate knowledge of supervision models and practices.

Program-defined elements associated with this competency

Element 2: Demonstrate skills of clinical supervision

Required training/experiential activities to meet each element.
COUN 8540 (Counseling Supervision – Theory and Practice) is used to evaluate Elements 1 and 2

How outcomes are measured for each training/experiential activity listed above.
Both elements for this outcome are measured by grades in COUN 8540 Counseling Supervision – Theory and Practice.

Minimum levels of achievement (MLAs) for each outcome measure/evaluation tool listed above.

The grade in COUN 8540 must be “C” or better.

Competency: (ix) Consultation and interprofessional/interdisciplinary skills

Element 1: Demonstrate knowledge and respect for the roles and perspectives of other professions.

Element 2: Demonstrates knowledge of consultation models and practices.

Required training/experiential activities to meet each element.
Element 1:
Practicum Classes (COUN 7910 Beginning Practicum and COUN 8910 Advanced Practicum)

*Competency Portfolio

*For students who enter the program during or after Fall, 2017

Element 2:
COUN 8400 Professional Seminar in Counseling Psychology

How outcomes are measured for each training/experiential activity listed above.
• Grades from the following courses are used to measure competency:

o COUN 8400 Professional Seminar in Counseling Psychology

o Practicum Classes (COUN 7910 Beginning Practicum and COUN 8910 Advanced Practicum) which requires certain ratings on Practicum/Program Approved Clinical Experience (PACE) Student Evaluation Form

o Competency Portfolio is part of the process of moving towards candidacy for students who enter during or after Fall, 2017 (see Policy #5; see the Professional Skills Rating Form item #6)

Minimum levels of achievement (MLAs) for each outcome measure/evaluation tool listed above.

The grade in COUN 8400 must be “C” or better.

Grades in Practicum courses (COUN 7910 Beginning Practicum and COUN 8910 Advanced Practicum) must be “Satisfactory” (because all grades of “Unsatisfactory” are considered equivalent to grades of “F” and therefore unacceptable, see Policy #22 of the Program Policies). For years prior to 2017, this required that the student not receive any rating below “Barely Adequate” on the item “Ability to with other professionals” for those completing courses prior to 2010. Between 2010 and 2016, the policies require that students in COUN 7910 not receive a rating of ”unacceptable” on the item and no more than three dimensions can be rated “substantially below expectations.” Also, between 2010 and 2016, the policies require that students in COUN 8910 not be rated as “unacceptable” in any area including on the relevant item and they may receive no more than one rating of “substantially below expectations.” Starting Spring, 2017, we use a new form that provides better anchors. Now, policies require, as articulated in Policy #23 in the Program Policies) and Practicum Guidelines (see section VII. Student Evaluation), that students in COUN 7910 not be rated as “unacceptable” in any area and that no more than two of the rated dimensions can be rated “substantially below beginning practicum student skill level.” In addition, students in COUN 7910 must be rated as “consistent with beginning practicum student skill level” or better in at least half of the rated dimensions. Similarly, students in 8910 must not receive any rating of “unacceptable” and no more than one rated dimension can be rated “below beginning practicum student skill level.” In addition, at least half of the rated dimensions must be rated “consistent with some prior clinical experience” or better.

For students who enter the program during or after Fall, 2017, student must be rated as competent on the Professional Skills Rating Form as part of the Competency Portfolio for all items including item 6. Rating of competence on the Professional Skills Rating Form for item #6 requires “the student receive ratings of skills being “consistent with some prior clinical experience” from all supervisors for all areas rated (including for item #17, “Ability to work with other professionals”) during the most recent term at the time faculty are asked to complete this form.” In other words, faculty review all Practicum/Program Approved Clinical Experience (PACE) Student Evaluation Forms from the prior semester to ensure the criteria is met. This will be used, for students who enter the program during or after Fall, 2017, as a requirement for students to be eligible to take the Oral Exam. Passing the Oral Exam is a requirement to apply for internship; therefore, this requirement helps establish readiness for internship.

Program-Specific Competencies

Program-Specific Competency 1: Group Therapy

• Demonstrate knowledge of the theoretical foundations of group counseling/psychotherapy

• Demonstrate understanding of types of groups and other considerations that affect the facilitation of therapy groups in varied settings

• Implement group therapy interventions informed by theories of group therapy consistent with counseling psychology, evidence-based practices, and needs of the group and group members

Required training/experiential activities used to meet each element.
All training/experiential components are found in COUN 7340 Group Counseling. For students who during or after Fall, 2017, students must also obtain experience related to Element 3 in clinical placements. Students will work with their advisor and the Director of Practicum Training to identify clinical placements where they can obtain the experience needed to meet this program requirement.

How outcomes are measured for each training/experiential activity listed above.
• Grade in COUN 7340 Group Counseling is used to evaluate all three elements. For students who enter the program during or after Fall, 2017, the Group Therapy Evaluation form is also used to evaluate Element 3. The form is completed by the
psychologist at the practicum site responsible for supervising the group therapy provided by the student. This is submitted as part of the Competency Portfolio.

Minimum levels of achievement (MLAs) for each outcome measure/evaluation tool listed above.

All students must obtain a grade of “C” or better in COUN 7340.

For students who enter the program during or after Fall, 2017, they must earn a grade of “B” or better in COUN 7340 and must obtain ratings of competency “consistent with some prior clinical experience” for each domain rated on the Group Therapy Evaluation Form (students are not required to obtain a rating for “Ability to identify and select clients appropriate for group therapy”).

Program-Specific Competency 2: Social Justice

• Identify social injustices for which change efforts can be informed by psychological science and values of counseling psychology.

• Apply knowledge of social justice and advocacy principles to an identified social injustice.

Required training/experiential activities used to meet each element.
Training in Element 1 occurs in COUN 8260 Colloquium in Counseling Psychology IV and in COUN 8400 Professional Seminar in Counseling Psychology. Training and experiential activities for Element 2 are also part of COUN 8400 Professional Seminar in Counseling Psychology

How outcomes are measured for each training/experiential activity listed above.

• Grades in COUN 8260 Colloquium in Counseling Psychology IV and COUN 8400 Professional Seminar in Counseling Psychology are used to evaluate both elements/

Minimum levels of achievement (MLAs) for each outcome measure/evaluation tool listed above.

All students must obtain a grade of “Satisfactory” in COUN 8260 and a grade of “C” or better in COUN 8400. Such a grade requires a passing grade on the social justice project (which, effective January 1, 2017, requires the student to obtain at least 80% of the points on parts A, B, and C on the Social Justice rubric).

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